As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on February 12, 2021

Registration No. 333-              

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

___________________________

FORM S-1
REGISTRATION STATEMENT
UNDER
THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

___________________________

Metromile, Inc.
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

___________________________

Delaware

 

6331

 

84-4916134

(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)

 

(Primary Standard Industrial
Classification Code No.)

 

(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

425 Market Street #700
San Francisco, CA 94105
Tel: (888) 242
-5204
(Address, Including Zip Code, and Telephone Number, Including Area Code, of Registrant’s Principal Executive Offices)

___________________________

Dan Preston
Chief Executive Officer
Metromile, Inc.
425 Market Street #700
San Francisco, CA 94105
Tel: (888) 242
-5204
(Name, Address, Including Zip Code, and Telephone Number, Including Area Code, of Agent for Service)

___________________________

Copies to:

Rachel Proffitt
Marianne Sarrazin
Daniel Paramés
Cooley LLP
101 California Street, 5
th Floor
San Francisco, California 94111
-5800
Tel: (415) 693
-2000

___________________________

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public: From time to time after the effective date of this registration statement.

If any of the securities being registered on this Form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933, please check the following box. S

If this Form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, please check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. £

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. £

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. £

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934:

Large accelerated filer

£

Accelerated filer

£

 

Non-accelerated filer

S

Smaller reporting company

S

     

Emerging growth company

S

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act. £

 

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CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE

Title of Each Class of Securities to be Registered

 

Amount to be
Registered
(1)

 

Proposed
Maximum
Offering
Price Per
Share

 

Proposed
Maximum
Aggregate
Offering
Price

 

Amount of
Registration
Fee

Common Stock, $0.0001 par value per share

 

58,538,107

(2)

 

$

17.23

(3)

 

$

1,008,611,583.61

 

$

110,039.52

 

Warrants to purchase Common Stock

 

180,000

(4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(5)

Total

 

58,718,107

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

1,008,611,583.61

 

$

110,039.52

 

____________

(1)      Pursuant to Rule 416(a), there are also being registered an indeterminable number of additional securities as may be issued to prevent dilution resulting from share splits, share dividends or similar transactions.

(2)      Consists of (i) 50,871,441 shares of Common Stock registered for sale by the selling securityholders named in this registration statement (including the shares referred to in the following clause (ii)), (ii) 180,000 shares of Common Stock issuable upon the exercise of 180,000 Placement Warrants (as defined below) and (iii) 7,666,666 shares of Common Stock issuable upon the exercise of 7,666,666 Public Warrants (as defined below).

(3)      Pursuant to Rule 457(c) under the Securities Act, and solely for the purpose of calculating the registration fee, the proposed maximum offering price per share is $17.23, which is the average of the high and low prices of the Common Stock on February 5, 2021 on The Nasdaq Capital Market.

(4)      Represents (i) the resale of 180,000 Placement Warrants.

(5)      In accordance with Rule 457(i), the entire registration fee for the Warrants (as defined below) is allocated to the shares of Common Stock underlying the Warrants, and no separate fee is payable for the Warrants.

The registrant hereby amends this registration statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the registrant shall file a further amendment that specifically states that this registration statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act or until the registration statement shall become effective on such date as the Securities and Exchange Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.

  

 

Table of Contents

The information in this preliminary prospectus is not complete and may be changed. Neither we nor the selling securityholders may sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This preliminary prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.

SUBJECT TO COMPLETION — DATED FEBRUARY 12, 2021

PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS

Up to 50,871,441 Shares of Common Stock

Up to 7,846,666 Shares of Common Stock Issuable Upon Exercise of Warrants

Up to 180,000 Warrants

_____________________________________

This prospectus relates to the issuance by us of an aggregate of up to 7,846,666 shares of our common stock, $0.0001 par value per share (“Common Stock”), which consists of (i) up to 180,000 shares of Common Stock that are issuable upon the exercise of 180,000 warrants (the “Placement Warrants”) originally issued in a private placement in connection with the initial public offering of INSU Acquisition Corp. II (“INSU”) by the holders thereof and (ii) up to 7,666,666 shares of Common Stock that are issuable upon the exercise of 7,666,666 warrants (the “Public Warrants” and, together with the Placement Warrants, the “Warrants”) originally issued in the initial public offering of INSU by the holders thereof. We will receive the proceeds from any exercise of any Warrants for cash.

This prospectus also relates to the offer and sale from time to time by the selling securityholders named in this prospectus (the “Selling Securityholders”) of (i) up to 50,871,441 shares of Common Stock (including up to 180,000 shares of Common Stock that may be issued upon exercise of the Placement Warrants and up to 2,768,776 shares of Common Stock issuable as Additional Shares (as defined below) and (ii) up to 180,000 Placement Warrants. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of shares of Common Stock or Warrants by the Selling Securityholders pursuant to this prospectus. However, we will pay the expenses, other than underwriting discounts and commissions and expenses incurred by the Selling Securityholders for brokerage, accounting, tax or legal services or any other expenses incurred by the Selling Securityholders in disposing of the securities, associated with the sale of securities pursuant to this prospectus.

We are registering the securities for resale pursuant to the Selling Securityholders’ registration rights under certain agreements between us and the Selling Securityholders. Our registration of the securities covered by this prospectus does not mean that the Selling Securityholders will offer or sell any of the shares of Common Stock or Warrants. The Selling Securityholders may offer, sell or distribute all or a portion of their shares of Common Stock or Warrants publicly or through private transactions at prevailing market prices or at negotiated prices. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of shares of Common Stock or Warrants by the Selling Securityholders pursuant to this prospectus. We provide more information about how the Selling Securityholders may sell the shares or Warrants in the section entitled “Plan of Distribution.”

We are an “emerging growth company” as defined in Section 2(a) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and are subject to reduced public company reporting requirements. This prospectus complies with the requirements that apply to an issuer that is an emerging growth company.

Our Common Stock and Public Warrants are listed on The Nasdaq Capital Market (“Nasdaq”) under the symbols “MILE” and “MILEW,” respectively. On February 11, 2021, the closing price of our Common Stock was $17.40 and the closing price for our Public Warrants was $4.76.

_____________________________________

See the section entitled “Risk Factors” beginning on page 7 of this prospectus to read about factors you should consider before buying our securities.

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

The date of this prospectus is         , 2021.

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Page

ABOUT THIS PROSPECTUS

 

ii 

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

iii 

SUMMARY

 

1

RISK FACTORS

 

USE OF PROCEEDS

 

46 

DETERMINATION OF OFFERING PRICE

 

47 

MARKET INFORMATION FOR COMMON STOCK AND DIVIDEND POLICY

 

48 

SELECTED HISTORICAL FINANCIAL INFORMATION OF LEGACY METROMILE

 

49

SELECTED HISTORICAL FINANCIAL INFORMATION OF INSU

 

50

UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED COMBINED FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

51 

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

64 

BUSINESS

 

86 

MANAGEMENT

 

109 

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

115 

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

125 

PRINCIPAL SECURITYHOLDERS

 

130 

SELLING SECURITYHOLDERS

 

132 

DESCRIPTION OF OUR SECURITIES

 

137

MATERIAL UNITED STATES FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSEQUENCES

 

144 

PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION

 

150 

LEGAL MATTERS

 

152 

EXPERTS

 

152 

WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION

 

153 

INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

F-1

PART II INFORMATION NOT REQUIRED IN PROSPECTUS

 

II-1

EXHIBIT INDEX

 

II-3

SIGNATURES

 

II-7

_____________________________________

You should rely only on the information provided in this prospectus, as well as the information incorporated by reference into this prospectus and any applicable prospectus supplement. Neither we nor the Selling Securityholders have authorized anyone to provide you with different information. Neither we nor the Selling Securityholders are making an offer of these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer is not permitted. You should not assume that the information in this prospectus or any applicable prospectus supplement is accurate as of any date other than the date of the applicable document. Since the date of this prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference into this prospectus, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may have changed.

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ABOUT THIS PROSPECTUS

This prospectus is part of a registration statement on Form S-1 that we filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) using the “shelf” registration process. Under this shelf registration process, the Selling Securityholders may, from time to time, sell the securities offered by them described in this prospectus. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale by such Selling Securityholders of the securities offered by them described in this prospectus. This prospectus also relates to the issuance by us of the shares of Common Stock issuable upon the exercise of any Warrants. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of shares of Common Stock underlying the Warrants pursuant to this prospectus, except with respect to amounts received by us upon the exercise of the Warrants for cash.

Neither we nor the Selling Securityholders have authorized anyone to provide you with any information or to make any representations other than those contained in this prospectus or any applicable prospectus supplement or any free writing prospectuses prepared by or on behalf of us or to which we have referred you. Neither we nor the Selling Securityholders take responsibility for, or provide any assurance as to the reliability of, any other information that others may give you. Neither we nor the Selling Securityholders will make an offer to sell these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.

We may also provide a prospectus supplement or post-effective amendment to the registration statement to add information to, or update or change information contained in, this prospectus. You should read both this prospectus and any applicable prospectus supplement or post-effective amendment to the registration statement together with the additional information to which we refer you in the sections of this prospectus entitled “Where You Can Find More Information.”

On February 9, 2021 (the “Closing Date”), INSU, our predecessor company, consummated the previously announced business combination pursuant to that certain Agreement and Plan of Merger and Reorganization, dated November 24, 2020, as amended on January 21, 2021 and February 8, 2021 (the “Merger Agreement”), by and among INSU, INSU II Merger Sub Corp., a Delaware corporation and direct wholly owned subsidiary of INSU (“Merger Sub”) and Metromile Operating Company (formerly known as MetroMile, Inc.), a Delaware corporation (“Legacy Metromile”). Pursuant to the terms of the Merger Agreement, a business combination between INSU and Legacy Metromile was effected through the merger of Merger Sub with and into Legacy Metromile, with Legacy Metromile continuing as the surviving entity and a wholly owned direct subsidiary of the Company, which we refer to collectively as the Merger. On the Closing Date, and in connection with the closing of the Merger (the “Closing”), INSU changed its name to Metromile, Inc.

Unless the context indicates otherwise, references in this prospectus to the “Company,” “Metromile,” “we,” “us,” “our” and similar terms refer to Metromile, Inc. (formerly known as INSU Acquisition Corp. II) and its consolidated subsidiaries (including Legacy Metromile). References to “INSU” refer to our predecessor company prior to the consummation of the Merger.

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Table of Contents

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This prospectus contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act, and Section 21E of the Exchange Act. We have based these forward-looking statements on our current expectations and projections about future events. All statements, other than statements of present or historical fact included in this prospectus, our future financial performance, strategy, expansion plans, future operations, future operating results, estimated revenues, losses, projected costs, prospects, plans and objectives of management are forward-looking statements. Any statements that refer to projections, forecasts or other characterizations of future events or circumstances, including any underlying assumptions, are forward-looking statements. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “continue,” “could,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intends,” “may,” “might,” “plan,” “possible,” “potential,” “predict,” “project,” “should,” “will,” “would” or the negative of such terms or other similar expressions. These forward-looking statements are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and assumptions about us that may cause our actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Except as otherwise required by applicable law, we disclaim any duty to update any forward-looking statements, all of which are expressly qualified by the statements in this section, to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this prospectus. We caution you that these forward-looking statements are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, most of which are difficult to predict and many of which are beyond our control.

Forward-looking statements in this prospectus may include, for example, statements about:

•        our ability to recognize the anticipated benefits of the Merger, which may be affected by, among other things, competition and the ability of the combined business to grow and manage growth profitably;

•        our financial and business performance, including financial projections and business metrics and any underlying assumptions thereunder;

•        changes in our strategy, future operations, financial position, estimated revenues and losses, projected costs, prospects and plans;

•        the implementation, market acceptance and success of our business model;

•        our ability to scale in a cost-effective manner;

•        developments and projections relating to our competitors and industry;

•        the impact of health epidemics, including the COVID-19 pandemic, on our business and the actions we may take in response thereto;

•        our expectations regarding our ability to obtain and maintain intellectual property protection and not infringe on the rights of others;

•        expectations regarding the time during which we will be an emerging growth company under the JOBS Act;

•        our future capital requirements and sources and uses of cash;

•        our ability to obtain funding for our future operations;

•        our business, expansion plans and opportunities; and

•        the outcome of any known and unknown litigation and regulatory proceedings.

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These statements are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and assumptions that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected or otherwise implied by the forward-looking statements, including the following:

•        the outcome of any legal proceedings;

•        our ability to recognize the anticipated benefits of the Merger, which may be affected by, among other things, competition and the ability of the combined business to grow and manage growth profitably;

•        our success in retaining or recruiting, or changes required in, officers, key employees or directors;

•        changes in applicable laws or regulations;

•        our ability to execute our business model, including our ability to attract new customers and retain existing customers, including in a cost-effective manner;

•        the possibility that the COVID-19 pandemic may adversely affect our results of operations, financial position and cash flows; and

•        the possibility that we may be adversely affected by other economic, business or competitive factors.

Given these risks and uncertainties, you should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Additional cautionary statements or discussions of risks and uncertainties that could affect our results or the achievement of the expectations described in forward-looking statements may also be contained in any accompanying prospectus supplement.

Should one or more of the risks or uncertainties described in this prospectus, or should underlying assumptions prove incorrect, actual results and plans could differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements. Additional information concerning these and other factors that may impact the operations and projections discussed herein can be found in the section entitled “Risk Factors” and in our periodic filings with the SEC. Our SEC filings are available publicly on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.

You should read this prospectus and any accompanying prospectus supplement completely and with the understanding that our actual future results, levels of activity and performance as well as other events and circumstances may be materially different from what we expect. We qualify all of our forward-looking statements by these cautionary statements.

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Table of Contents

PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

This summary highlights selected information appearing in this prospectus. Because it is a summary, it may not contain all of the information that may be important to you. To understand this offering fully, you should read this entire prospectus carefully, including the information set forth in the sections entitled “Risk Factors,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” “Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Combined Financial Information,” “Business” and the consolidated financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus before making an investment decision.

The Company

We started Metromile based on the simple observation that the physical world is being increasingly digitized, that this digital data can be used to better estimate the future, and that the best opportunity to create value for everyday customers in an increasingly predictable world is to reinvent insurance, one of the largest and most important global markets.

At its core, insurance financially protects the insured customer from the occurrence of specific future events. If these events can be more accurately estimated, using data and data science, then the insurance provided can be more accurately priced — lower likelihood events would cause the price of insurance to go down and higher likelihood events would cause the price of insurance to go up. The proliferation of sensor data, from cars, mobile phones, and elsewhere, means we have a greater ability to estimate the likelihood of future events and, thus, help many customers who are overpaying for insurance save money.

We founded Metromile in 2011 to realize this opportunity and tackle the broken auto insurance industry. With data science as our foundation, we offer our insurance customers real time, personalized auto insurance policies, priced and billed by the mile, with rates based on precisely how and how much they actually drive, instead of using the industry standard approximations and estimates that make prices unfair for most customers.

Background

We were originally known as INSU Acquisition Corp. II. On February 9, 2021, INSU consummated the Merger with Legacy Metromile pursuant to the Merger Agreement dated as of November 24, 2020, as amended on January 12, 2021, and further amended on February 8, 2021, by and among INSU, Merger Sub and Legacy Metromile. In connection with the Closing of the Merger, INSU changed its name to Metromile, Inc. Legacy Metromile was deemed to be the accounting acquirer in the Merger based on an analysis of the criteria outlined in Accounting Standards Codification 805. While INSU was the legal acquirer in the Merger, because Legacy Metromile was deemed the accounting acquirer, the historical financial statements of Legacy Metromile became the historical financial statements of the combined company, upon the consummation of the Merger.

At the effective time of the Merger (the “Effective Time”), by virtue of the Merger and without any action on the part of Parent, Merger Sub, Legacy Metromile or the holders of any of the Company’s or Legacy Metromile’s securities:

a)      Each Legacy Metromile Preferred Share issued and outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time was automatically converted into a number of shares of common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, of Legacy Metromile (“Legacy Metromile Common Shares”) at the then-effective conversion rate as calculated pursuant to the terms of the organizational documents of Legacy Metromile (the “Preferred Stock Conversion”). “Legacy Metromile Preferred Shares” means, collectively, Legacy Metromile Series A Convertible Preferred Stock, Legacy Metromile Series B Convertible Preferred Stock, Legacy Metromile Series C Convertible Preferred Stock, Legacy Metromile Junior Convertible Preferred Stock, Legacy Metromile Series D Convertible Preferred Stock, Legacy Metromile Series E Convertible Preferred Stock and Legacy Metromile E-1 Convertible Preferred Stock.

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b)      Each Legacy Metromile Common Share that was issued and outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time (excluding any Legacy Metromile Common Shares subject to forfeiture restrictions or other restrictions issued pursuant to an award granted under the Legacy Metromile Option Plan (“Metromile Restricted Shares”)), following the Preferred Stock Conversion, was converted into the right to receive the following:

i.       for holders of such Legacy Metromile Common Shares that made a proper and timely election to receive cash with respect to such Legacy Metromile Common Share (a “Cash Election” and each such share, a “Cash Electing Share”), (A) an amount in cash equal to the product of (1) approximately $10.1486 (the “Per Share Merger Consideration Value”) and (2) a fraction, the numerator of which is $32,000,000 and the denominator of which is the Per Share Merger Consideration Value multiplied by the number of cash electing shares (such fraction, the “Cash Fraction”) and (B) a number of validly issued, fully paid and nonassessable shares of Common Stock equal to the product of, (1) approximately 1.01486 (the “Per Share Stock Consideration”) and (2) one minus the Cash Fraction; and

ii.      for holders of such Legacy Metromile Common Shares that made a proper election to receive shares of Common Stock or did not make any election (a “Stock Election” and each such share, a “Stock Electing Share”), the Per Share Stock Consideration Restricted Shares.

c)      17,000,000 shares of Common Stock were issued and sold for $10.00 per share and an aggregate purchase price of $170.0 million pursuant to certain subscription agreements related thereto (the “Subscription Agreements”), executed concurrently with the Merger Agreement (the “PIPE Investment”).

d)      1,177,000 shares of the Class B Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share, of INSU (“INSU Class B Common Stock”) were cancelled, transfer restrictions were placed on on 5,100,334 shares of INSU Class B Common Stock in accordance with the terms of the Sponsor Share Cancellation and Vesting Agreement, dated as of November 24, 2020, by and among INSU, Insurance Acquisition Sponsor II, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (“INSU Sponsor”) and Dioptra Advisors II, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (together with INSU Sponsor, the “Sponsor”) and 6,669,667 shares of INSU Class B Common Stock were converted into 6,669,667 shares of Common Stock in connection with the Merger in accordance with the terms of the Merger Agreement. The transfer restrictions on 2,550,167 shares held by the Sponsor shall be removed when the Common Stock price is greater than $15.00 per share for any period of 20 trading days out of 30 consecutive trading days, and 2,550,167 shares held by the Sponsor shall have the applicable transfer restrictions removed when the Common Stock price is greater than $17.00 per share for any period of 20 trading days out of 30 consecutive trading days.

e)      Each issued and outstanding share of common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, of Merger Sub was converted into and became one validly issued, fully paid and nonassessable share of common stock of Legacy Metromile.

f)      All Legacy Metromile Shares held in the treasury of Legacy Metromile or owned by INSU or Merger Sub immediately prior to the Effective Time (each, an “Excluded Share”) were canceled without any conversion thereof and no payment or distribution was made with respect thereto.

g)      Each option to receive Legacy Metromile Common Shares that was vested and outstanding as of the Effective Time (“Vested Legacy Metromile Options”) was automatically converted into a number of restricted stock units denominated in shares of Common Stock (each, a “Vested RSU”) equal to (A) the excess, if any, of (i) the Per Share Merger Consideration Value over (ii) the exercise price per Legacy Metromile Common Share subject to such Vested Legecy Metromile Option, multiplied by (B) the number of Legacy Metromile Common Shares subject to such Metromile Option (the “Aggregate Option Spread), divided by the Reference Price (rounded down to the nearest whole share).

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h)      Each option to receive Legacy Metromile Common Shares that was unvested and outstanding as of the Effective Time (“Unvested Legacy Metromile Options”) was automatically converted into a number of options to purchase shares of Common Stock (each, a “Converted Option”), equal to the product (rounded down to the nearest whole share) of (A) the total number of Legacy Metromile Common Shares subject to such Unvested Legacy Metromile Option immediately prior to the Effective Time multiplied by (B) the Per Share Merger Consideration Value divided by the Reference Price (the “Per Share Stock Consideration”), and the exercise price per share of Common Stock equals the quotient (with the result rounded up to the nearest whole cent) of (A) the exercise price per Legacy Metromile Common Share of such Unvested Legacy Metromile Option immediately prior to the Effective Time divided by (B) the Per Share Stock Consideration. Each such Converted Option is subject to the same terms and conditions, including the applicable vesting schedule, as applied to the corresponding Unvested Legacy Metromile Option immediately prior to the Effective Time.

i)       Each share of Legacy Metromile Common Stock that was subject to forfeiture restrictions or other restrictions issued pursuant to an award granted under the Legacy Metromile Option Plan (“Legacy Metromile Restricted Shares”) was converted into Company Common Stock that is subject to the terms and conditions giving rise to a substantial risk of forfeiture that applied to such Legacy Metromile Restricted Shares immediately prior to the Effective Time to the extent consistent with the terms of such Legacy Metromile Restricted Shares.

j)       Each Legacy Metromile warrant outstanding at the Effective Time was exercised into a number of Legacy Metromile Common Shares in accordance with the terms of the warrant agreement amendment applicable to such warrant and the information set forth in the merger payment schedule delivered prior to the Closing Date pursuant to the Merger Agreement.

k)      If at any time during the 24 months following the Closing the closing share price of the Common Stock is greater than $15.00 over any 20 trading days within any 30 trading day period, a total of 10,000,000 newly issued shares of Common Stock (“Additional Shares”) will be payable to Legacy Metromile stockholders and holders of Vested Legacy Metromile Options (the “Earnout Participants”), as of immediately prior to the Effective Time based on the proportion of (A) each Earnout Participant’s aggregate number of (i) Legacy Metromile Shares held as of immediately prior to the Effective Time, excluding, for this purpose, any Legacy Metromile Restricted Shares plus (ii) the number of Vested RSU Equivalents (as defined below) calculated as of immediately prior to the Effective Time, as compared to the sum of (B)(i) Legacy Metromile Shares excluding, for this purpose any Company Restricted Shares and (ii) Vested RSU Equivalents held by Earnout Participants in the aggregate as of immediately prior to the Effective Time (the “Pro Rata Share”). “Vested RSU Equivalents” means, with respect to each holder of Vested Metromile Options, as of the determination date, a number of shares equal to such holder’s Aggregate Option Spread divided by the Per Share Merger Consideration Value, rounded down to the nearest whole share. The Additional Shares may be also become payable upon certain acceleration or change of control events.

Pursuant to our prior amended and restated certificate of incorporation, as amended, each share of INSU Class B Common Stock converted into one share of INSU’s Class A Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share (the “INSU Class A Common Stock”), at the Closing. After the Closing and following the effectiveness of our second amended and restated certificate of incorporation (the “Certificate of Incorporation”), each share of INSU Class A Common Stock was automatically reclassified, redesignated and changed into one validly issued, fully paid and non-assessable share of Common Stock, without any further action by us or any stockholder.

Our Common Stock and Public Warrants are currently listed on Nasdaq under the symbols “MILE” and “MILEW,” respectively.

The rights of holders of our Common Stock and Warrants are governed by our Certificate of Incorporation, our amended and restated bylaws (the “Bylaws”) and the Delaware General Corporation Law (the “DGCL”), and, in the case of the Warrants, the Warrant Agreement, dated September 2, 2020 (the “Warrant Agreement”), between INSU and Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company, as the warrant agent. See the sections entitled “Description of our Securities” and “Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions.”

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Risks Associated with Our Business

Our ability to implement our business strategy is subject to numerous risks that you should be aware of before making an investment decision. These risks are described more fully in the section entitled “Risk Factors,” immediately following this prospectus summary. These risks include the following, among others:

•        We have a history of net losses and could continue to incur substantial net losses in the future.

•        Our historical operating results indicate substantial doubt exists related to our ability to continue as a going concern.

•        We may lose existing customers or fail to acquire new customers.

•        We may require additional capital to support business growth or to satisfy our regulatory capital and surplus requirements, and this capital might not be available on acceptable terms, if at all.

•        The COVID-19 pandemic has caused disruption to our operations and may negatively impact our business, key metrics, and results of operations in numerous ways that remain unpredictable.

•        We rely on telematics, mobile technology and its digital platform to collect data points that we evaluate in pricing and underwriting insurance policies, managing claims and customer support, and improving business processes. To the extent regulators prohibit or restrict this collection or use of this data, our business could be harmed.

•        Regulatory changes may limit our ability to develop or implement our telematics-based pricing model and/or may eliminate or restrict the confidentiality of our proprietary technology.

•        We expect a number of factors to cause its results of operations to fluctuate on a quarterly and annual basis, which may make it difficult to predict future performance.

•        Denial of claims or our failure to accurately and timely pay claims could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, brand and prospects.

•        Unexpected increases in the frequency or severity of claims may adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

•        Failure to maintain our risk-based capital at the required levels could adversely affect our ability to maintain regulatory authority to conduct our business.

•        We are subject to stringent and changing privacy and data security laws, regulations, and standards related to data privacy and security. Our actual or perceived failure to comply with such obligations could harm our reputation, subject us to significant fines and liability, or adversely affect our business.

•        If we are unable to underwrite risks accurately or charge competitive yet profitable rates to our customers, our business, results of operations and financial condition will be adversely affected.

•        Litigation and legal proceedings filed by or against us and our subsidiaries could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

•        The insurance business, including the market for automobile, renters’ and homeowners’ insurance, is historically cyclical in nature, and we may experience periods with excess underwriting capacity and unfavorable premium rates, which could adversely affect our business.

•        We are subject to extensive regulation and potential further restrictive regulation may increase our operating costs and limit its growth.

•        Our actual incurred losses may be greater than our loss and loss adjustment expense reserves, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

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Corporate Information

INSU, which was incorporated in the State of Delaware in October 2018 for the purpose of effecting a merger, capital stock exchange, asset acquisition, stock purchase, reorganization or similar business combination involving INSU and one or more businesses. INSU completed its initial public offering (the “IPO”) in September 2020. In February 2021, Merger Sub merged with and into Legacy Metromile, with Legacy Metromile surviving the merger as a wholly owned subsidiary of INSU. In connection with the Merger, we changed our name to Metromile, Inc. Our principal executive offices are located at 425 Market Street #700, San Francisco, CA 94105. Our telephone number is (888) 242-5204. Our website address is www.metromile.com. Information contained on our website or connected thereto does not constitute part of, and is not incorporated by reference into, this prospectus or the registration statement of which it forms a part.

Implications of Being an Emerging Growth Company and a Smaller Reporting Company

We are an emerging growth company as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 (the “JOBS Act”). We will remain an emerging growth company under the JOBS Act until the earliest of (a) the last day of our first fiscal year following the fifth anniversary of INSU’s IPO, (b) the last date of our fiscal year in which we have total annual gross revenue of at least $1.07 billion, (c) the date on which we are deemed to be a “large accelerated filer” under the rules of the SEC with at least $700.0 million of outstanding securities held by non-affiliates or (d) the date on which we have issued more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt securities during the previous three years.

We are also a “smaller reporting company” as defined in the Securities and Exchange Act. We may continue to be a smaller reporting company even after we are no longer an emerging growth company. We may take advantage of certain of the scaled disclosures available to smaller reporting companies and will be able to take advantage of these scaled disclosures for so long as the market value of our Common Stock held by non-affiliates is less than $250.0 million measured on the last business day of our second fiscal quarter, or our annual revenue is less than $100.0 million during the most recently completed fiscal year and the market value of our Common Stock held by non-affiliates is less than $700.0 million measured on the last business day of our second fiscal quarter.

As a result, the information in this prospectus and that we provide to our investors in the future may be different than what you might receive from other public reporting companies.

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THE OFFERING

Issuer

 

Metromile, Inc. (formerly known as INSU Acquisition Corp. II)

Issuance of Common Stock

   

Shares of Common Stock Offered by the Company

 


7,846,666 shares of Common Stock, including shares of Common Stock issuable upon exercise of the Warrants, consisting of (i) 180,000 shares of Common Stock that are issuable upon the exercise of 180,000 Placement Warrants by the holders thereof; and (ii) 7,666,666 shares of Common Stock that are issuable upon the exercise of 7,666,666 Public Warrants.

Shares of Common Stock Outstanding Prior to Exercise of All Warrants

 


126,727,494 shares (as of February 9, 2021).

Shares of Common Stock Outstanding Assuming Exercise of All Warrants

 


134,584,538 shares (based on total shares outstanding as of February 9, 2021).

Exercise Price of Warrants

 

$11.50 per share, subject to adjustment as described herein.

Use of Proceeds

 

We will receive up to an aggregate of approximately $90.2 million from the exercise of the Warrants, assuming the exercise in full of all of the Warrants for cash. We expect to use the net proceeds from the exercise of the Warrants for general corporate purposes. See the section entitled “Use of Proceeds.”

Resale of Common Stock and Warrants

   

Shares of Common Stock Offered by the Selling Securityholders

 


50,871,441 shares of Common Stock (including up to 180,000 shares of Common Stock that may be issued upon exercise of the Placement Warrants and 2,768,776 shares of Common Stock issuable as Additional Shares)

Warrants Offered by the Selling Securityholders

 


180,000 Placement Warrants.

Redemption

 

The Warrants are redeemable in certain circumstances. See the section entitled “Description of our Securities — Warrants” for further discussion.

Use of Proceeds

 

We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of shares of Common Stock or Warrants by the Selling Securityholders.

Lock-Up Restrictions

 

Certain of our stockholders are subject to certain restrictions on transfer until the termination of applicable lock-up periods. See the section entitled “Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions” for further discussion.

Market for Common Stock and
Warrants

 


Our Common Stock and Public Warrants are currently traded on Nasdaq under the symbols “MILE” and “MILEW,” respectively.

Risk Factors

 

See the section entitled “Risk Factors” and other information included in this prospectus for a discussion of factors you should consider before investing in our securities.

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RISK FACTORS

Investing in our securities involves risks. Before you make a decision to buy our securities, in addition to the risks and uncertainties discussed above under “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements,” you should carefully consider the specific risks set forth herein. If any of these risks actually occur, it may materially harm our business, financial condition, liquidity and results of operations. As a result, the market price of our securities could decline, and you could lose all or part of your investment. Additionally, the risks and uncertainties described in this prospectus or any prospectus supplement are not the only risks and uncertainties that we face. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently believe to be immaterial may become material and adversely affect our business.

Summary of Risks:

Our business is subject to a number of risks of which you should be aware before making a decision to invest in our Common Stock. These risks include, among others, the following:

•        We have a history of net losses and could continue to incur substantial net losses in the future.

•        Our historical operating results indicate substantial doubt exists related to our ability to continue as a going concern.

•        We may lose existing customers or fail to acquire new customers.

•        We may require additional capital to support business growth or to satisfy our regulatory capital and surplus requirements, and this capital might not be available on acceptable terms, if at all.

•        The COVID-19 pandemic has caused disruption to our operations and may negatively impact our business, key metrics, and results of operations in numerous ways that remain unpredictable.

•        We rely on telematics, mobile technology and its digital platform to collect data points that we evaluate in pricing and underwriting insurance policies, managing claims and customer support, and improving business processes. To the extent regulators prohibit or restrict this collection or use of this data, our business could be harmed.

•        Regulatory changes may limit our ability to develop or implement our telematics-based pricing model and/or may eliminate or restrict the confidentiality of our proprietary technology.

•        We expect a number of factors to cause its results of operations to fluctuate on a quarterly and annual basis, which may make it difficult to predict future performance.

•        Denial of claims or our failure to accurately and timely pay claims could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, brand and prospects.

•        Unexpected increases in the frequency or severity of claims may adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

•        Failure to maintain our risk-based capital at the required levels could adversely affect our ability to maintain regulatory authority to conduct our business.

•        We are subject to stringent and changing privacy and data security laws, regulations, and standards related to data privacy and security. Our actual or perceived failure to comply with such obligations could harm our reputation, subject us to significant fines and liability, or adversely affect our business.

•        If we are unable to underwrite risks accurately or charge competitive yet profitable rates to our customers, our business, results of operations and financial condition will be adversely affected.

•        Litigation and legal proceedings filed by or against us and our subsidiaries could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

•        The insurance business, including the market for automobile, renters’ and homeowners’ insurance, is historically cyclical in nature, and we may experience periods with excess underwriting capacity and unfavorable premium rates, which could adversely affect our business.

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•        We are subject to extensive regulation and potential further restrictive regulation may increase our operating costs and limit its growth.

•        Our actual incurred losses may be greater than our loss and loss adjustment expense reserves, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Risks Related to Our Business

We have a history of net losses and could continue to incur substantial net losses in the future.

We have incurred recurring losses on an annual basis since our incorporation in 2011. We incurred net losses of $49.4 million and $57.2 million for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019, respectively, and a net loss of $36.4 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2020. We had an accumulated loss of $246.5 million and $282.9 million as of December 31, 2019 and September 30, 2020, respectively.

The principal driver of our losses to date is our insured losses paid associated with accidents and other insured events by our customers. Establishing adequate premium rates is necessary to generate sufficient revenue to offset losses, loss adjustments expenses (“LAE”) and other costs. If we do not accurately assess the risks that we underwrite, the premiums that we charge may not be adequate to cover our losses and expenses, which would adversely affect our results of operations and our profitability. Moreover, as we continue to invest in our business, we expect expenses to continue to increase in the near term. Such expenses may occur in the areas of telematics, digital marketing, brand advertising, consumer-facing technologies, core insurance operations services and lines of business not presently offered by Metromile. These investments may not result in increased revenue or growth in our business. If we fail to manage our losses or to grow our revenue sufficiently to keep pace with our investments and other expenses, our business will be seriously harmed.

In addition, we will incur additional expenses to support our growth, and we will continue to incur significant expenses in connection with the repayment of the outstanding principal and accrued interest on our credit facilities, under which we had approximately $59.2 million of gross borrowings outstanding as of September 30, 2020, a portion of which was paid in connection with the Closing of the Merger. As a public company, we will also incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses that we did not incur as a private company. We may encounter unforeseen or unpredictable factors, including unforeseen operating expenses, complications or delays, which may also result in increased costs. Further, it is difficult to predict the size and growth rate of our market or demand for our services and success of current or potential future competitors. As a result, we may not achieve or maintain profitability in future periods.

Our historical operating results indicate substantial doubt exists related to our ability to continue as a going concern. Our financial statements have been prepared assuming that we will continue as a going concern.

We have incurred recurring losses and an accumulated deficit of approximately $282.9 million as of September 30, 2020, related primarily to the development of our website, technology, customer acquisition, insurance losses and other operations. We had cash and cash equivalents of $21.0 million at September 30, 2020. These factors raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern and satisfying our estimated liquidity needs, If we continue to experience operating losses, and we are not able to generate additional liquidity through a capital raise or other cash infusion, we might need to secure additional sources of funds, which may or may not be available to us. Additionally, a failure to generate additional liquidity could negatively impact our ability to operate our business.

We may lose existing customers or fail to acquire new customers.

We believe that growth of our business and revenue depends upon our ability to continue to grow our business in the geographic markets that we currently serve by retaining our existing customers and adding new customers in our current as well as new geographic markets. Expanding into new geographic markets takes time, requires us to navigate and comply with extensive regulations and may occur more slowly than we expect or than it has occurred in the past. If we lose customers, our value will diminish. In particular, while loss performance has improved over time as more customers renew their policies and remain policyholders for longer, a future loss of customers could lead to higher loss ratios or loss ratios that cease to decline, which would adversely impact our profitability. If we

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fail to remain competitive on customer experience, pricing, and insurance coverage options, our ability to grow our business may also be adversely affected. In addition, we may fail to accurately predict risk segmentation of new customers or potential customers, which could also reduce our profitability.

While a key part of our business strategy is to retain and add customers in our existing markets and into our current product offerings, we also intend to expand our operations into new markets and new product offerings. In doing so, we may incur losses or otherwise fail to enter new markets or offer new products successfully. Our expansion into new markets and product offerings may place us in unfamiliar competitive environments and involve various risks, including competition, government regulation, the need to invest significant resources and the possibility that returns on such investments will not be achieved for several years or at all.

There are many factors that could negatively affect our ability to grow our customer base, including if:

•        we lose customers to new market entrants and/or existing competitors;

•        we do not obtain regulatory approvals necessary for expansion into new markets or in relation to our products (such as underwriting and rating requirements);

•        we fail to effectively use search engines, social media platforms, digital app stores, content-based online advertising, and other current and emerging online sources for generating traffic to our website and our mobile app;

•        our digital platform experiences disruptions;

•        we suffer reputational harm to our brand including from negative publicity, whether accurate or inaccurate;

•        we fail to expand geographically;

•        we fail to offer new and competitive products, to provide effective updates to our existing products or to keep pace with technological improvements in our industry;

•        customers have difficulty installing, updating or otherwise accessing our app or website on mobile devices or web browsers as a result of actions by us or third parties;

•        customers prefer less technological solutions or are unable or unwilling to adopt or embrace new technology;

•        the perception emerges that purchasing insurance products online is not as effective as purchasing those products through traditional offline methods;

•        technical or other problems frustrate the customer experience, particularly if those problems prevent us from generating quotes or paying claims in a fast and reliable manner; or

•        we are unable to address customer concerns regarding the content, privacy, and security of our digital platform.

Our inability to overcome these challenges could impair our ability to attract new customers and retain existing customers, and could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results and financial condition.

We may require additional capital to support business growth or to satisfy our regulatory capital and surplus requirements, and this capital might not be available on acceptable terms, if at all.

We intend to continue to make investments to support our business growth and may require additional funds to respond to business challenges, including the need to develop new features and products or enhance our existing products and services, satisfy our regulatory capital and surplus requirements, cover losses, improve our operating infrastructure or acquire complementary businesses and technologies. Many factors will affect our capital needs as well as their amount and timing, including our growth and profitability, regulatory requirements, market disruptions and other developments. If our present capital and surplus is insufficient to meet our current or future operating requirements, including regulatory capital and surplus requirements, or to cover losses, we may need to raise additional funds through financings or curtail our growth. We evaluate financing opportunities from time to time,

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and our ability to obtain financing will depend, among other things, on our development efforts, business plans and operating performance, as well as the condition of the capital markets at the time we seek financing. We cannot be certain that additional financing will be available to us on favorable terms, or at all.

If we raise additional funds through future issuances of equity or convertible debt securities, our existing stockholders could suffer significant dilution, and any new equity securities we issue could have rights, preferences and privileges superior to those of holders of our Common Stock. As an insurance company, we are subject to extensive laws and regulations in every jurisdiction in which we conduct business, and any such issuances of equity or convertible debt securities to secure additional funds may be impeded by regulatory approvals or requirements imposed by such regulatory authorities if such issuances were deemed to result in a person acquiring “control” of our company under applicable insurance laws and regulations. Such regulatory requirements may require potential investors to disclose their organizational structure and detailed financial statements as well as require managing partners, directors and/or senior officers submit biographical affidavits which may deter funds from investing in our company. Moreover, any debt financing, in addition to our outstanding credit facilities, that we secure in the future could subject us to restrictive covenants relating to our capital raising activities, our ability to make certain types of investments or payments, and other financial and operational matters, which may increase our difficulty to obtain additional capital or to pursue business opportunities, including new product offerings and potential acquisitions. We may not be able to obtain additional financing on terms favorable to us, if at all. If we are unable to obtain adequate financing or financing on terms satisfactory to us when we require it, our ability to continue to support our business growth and to respond to business challenges could be impaired, and our business, revenue, results of operations and financial condition may be materially harmed.

Further, we are restricted by covenants in our credit agreements. These covenants restrict, among other things, our ability to incur additional debt without lender consent or grant liens over our assets, which may limit our ability to obtain additional funds.

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused disruption to our operations and may negatively impact our business, key metrics, and results of operations in numerous ways that remain unpredictable.

Our business has been and may continue to be impacted by the effects of the outbreak of the novel strain of coronavirus, or COVID-19, which was declared a global pandemic in March 2020. This pandemic and related measures taken to contain the spread of COVID-19, such as government-mandated business closures, orders to “shelter in place” (“SIPs”) and travel and transportation restrictions, have negatively affected the U.S. and global economies, disrupted global supply chains, and led to unprecedented levels of unemployment. Beginning in the second quarter of 2020, our business was favorably impacted by the SIPs as our customers drove less. While our premiums collected declined due to per-mile billing, we had a corresponding material decline in incurred losses. Our business has also been impacted by certain state regulations related to COVID-19 relief efforts, including restrictions on the ability to cancel policies for non-payment, requiring deferral of insurance premium payments for up to 60 days and restrictions on increasing policy premiums. We continue to assess and update our business continuity plans in the context of this pandemic, including taking steps in an effort to help keep our employees healthy and safe. The spread of COVID-19 has caused us to modify our business practices (including employee travel, employee work locations in certain cases, and cancellation of physical participation in meetings, events, and conferences), and we expect to take further actions as may be required or recommended by government authorities or as we determine are in the best interests of our employees and customers. Furthermore, COVID-19 has impacted and may further impact the broader economies of affected countries, including negatively impacting economic growth, the proper functioning of financial and capital markets, foreign currency exchange rates, and interest rates. It is possible that the pandemic will cause an economic slowdown of potentially extended duration, as well as a global recession. This could result in an increase in costs associated with claims under our policies, as well as an increase in the number of customers experiencing difficulty paying premiums, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. It is also possible that working from home or other remote work arrangements adopted during the SIPs become permanent on a widespread basis, thereby resulting in further reduction in premiums collected due to per-mile billing, or a permanent reduced need for auto insurance. Furthermore, due to COVID-19’s negative impact on driving, regulators in many states continue to mandate or request that auto insurance companies refund a portion of their premium to their policyholders to reflect the insurer’s decrease in projected loss exposure due to the virus. In all of the states in which we operate, state insurance regulators have either encouraged, strongly suggested or mandated insurers to provide COVID-19-related consumer relief. Regulators in several states in which we operate or into which we plan to expand placed a mandatory

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moratorium on non-pay cancellations and could revive, add to, extend, or expand the scope of such moratoriums, providing consumers grace periods ranging from sixty (60) days to indefinite (based on the term of emergency orders) in duration, during which premium did not need to be paid in a timely fashion. These moratoriums resulted in an increase of premium write-offs from 1.6% during the quarter ended March 31, 2020 to 2.1% for the quarter ended June 30, 2020. Premium write-offs have been immaterial to date, but could be significant in the future. There were still several states with bulletins effective after December 31, 2020, and depending on the unpredictable nature of the pandemic and SIPs such moratoriums could be revived, added to, or extended. These mandates and similar regulations or suggestions could negatively impact our ability to charge or increase premiums to adequately cover our losses and could result in continued increased premium write-offs.

Though we continue to monitor the COVID-19 pandemic closely, due to the speed with which it continues to develop, the global breadth of its spread, the range of governmental and community reactions thereto and the unknown timing or effectiveness of any vaccine or treatment, there is considerable uncertainty around its duration and ultimate impact. The impact of the pandemic may also exacerbate the other risks described in these Risk Factors, and additional impacts may arise that we are not currently aware of, any of which could have a material effect on us. In addition, if there is a future resurgence of COVID-19, these negative impacts on our business may be further exacerbated. As a result, the full extent of the impact of the pandemic on our overall financial and operating results, whether in the near or long term, cannot be reasonably estimated at this time.

Our future growth and profitability depend in part on our ability to successfully operate in an insurance industry that is highly competitive.

Many of our primary competitors have well-established national brands and market similar products. Our competitors include large national insurance companies as well as up-and-coming companies. Several of these established national insurance companies are larger than us and have significant competitive advantages, including better name recognition, strong financial ratings, greater resources, easier access to capital, and offer more types of insurance than we do, such as homeowners and renters, which are often bundled together to help attract and retain customers. Our business model and technology is also still nascent compared to the established business models of the well-established incumbents in the insurance market. In addition, the insurance industry consistently attracts well-capitalized new entrants to the market. Our future growth will depend in large part on our ability to grow our insurance business in which traditional insurance companies retain certain advantages. In particular, unlike us, many of these competitors offer customers the ability to purchase multiple other types of insurance coverage and “bundle” them together into one policy and, in certain circumstances, include an umbrella liability policy for additional coverage at competitive prices. Moreover, we may in the future expand into new lines of business and offer additional products beyond automobile insurance, and as we do so, we could face intense competition from traditional insurance companies that are already established in such markets. These new insurance products could take months to be approved by regulatory authorities or may not be approved at all. We have invested in growth strategies by utilizing unique customer value propositions, differentiated product offerings and distinctive advertising campaigns. If we are unsuccessful through these strategies in generating new business, retaining a sufficient number of customers or retaining or acquiring key relationships, our ability to maintain or increase premiums written or the ability to sell our products could be adversely impacted. Because of the competitive nature of the insurance industry, there can be no assurance that we will continue to compete effectively within our industry, or that competitive pressures will not have a material effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.

We rely on telematics, mobile technology and our digital platform to collect data points that we evaluate in pricing and underwriting our insurance policies, managing claims and customer support, and improving business processes. To the extent regulators prohibit or restrict our collection or use of this data, our business could be harmed.

We use telematics, mobile technology and our digital platform to collect data points that we evaluate in pricing and underwriting certain of our insurance policies, managing claims and customer support, and improving business processes. If federal, state or international regulators were to determine that the type of data we collect, the process we use for collecting this data or how we use it unfairly discriminates against a protected class of people, regulators could move to prohibit or restrict our collection or use of this data. In addition, if legislation were to restrict our ability to collect driving behavior data, it could impair our capacity to underwrite insurance cost effectively, negatively impacting our revenue and earnings.

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Due to Proposition 103 in California, our largest market, we are currently limited in our ability to use telematics data beyond miles-driven to underwrite insurance, including data on how the car is driven. This could hinder our ability to accurately assess the risks that we underwrite in other states if they were to pass similar laws or regulations. In three other states where we currently operate, we do not use behavioral telematics data because it is either permitted, but we opted out given uncertainty regarding the impact such data would have on pricing or it is voluntary (meaning the policyholder has to opt in). As we aim to be a fully national provider of insurance across 49 states and the District of Columbia by 2022, we will need to comply with the rules and regulations of each market. At this time, we do not know which of our target markets prohibit, permit with conditions, or fully permit the use of behavioral telematics to set premiums, and if permitted, if this will be of benefit to us in pricing. While we are currently in discussions with regulators to allow the use of telematics to a greater extent to underwrite and price insurance policies, we cannot predict the outcome of these discussions, and there can be no assurance that state regulators will revise regulations accordingly, if at all, nor that current permissive states will further restrict the use of such data.

Although there is currently limited federal and state legislation outside of California restricting our ability to collect driving behavior data, private organizations are implementing principles and guidelines to protect driver privacy. The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers and Global Automakers established their Consumer Privacy Protection Principles to provide member automobile manufacturers with a framework with which to consider privacy and build privacy into their products and services while the National Automobile Dealers Association has partnered with the Future of Privacy Forum to produce consumer education guidelines that explain the kinds of information that may be collected by consumers’ cars, the guidelines that govern how it is collected and used, and the options consumers may have to protect their vehicle data. The Global Alliance for Vehicle Data Access is another organization that was formed to advocate for driver ownership of all vehicle data, particularly for insurance underwriting purposes. If federal or state legislators were to pass laws limiting our ability to collect driver data, such legislation could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

Some state regulators have expressed interest in the use of external data sources, algorithms and/or predictive models in insurance underwriting or rating. Specifically, regulators have raised questions about the potential for unfair discrimination, disparate impact, and lack of transparency associated with the use of external consumer data. A determination by federal or state regulators that the data points we collect and the process we use for collecting this data unfairly discriminates against a protected class of people could subject us to fines and other sanctions, including, but not limited to, disciplinary action, revocation and suspension of licenses, and withdrawal of product forms. Any such event could, in turn, materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. Although we have implemented policies and procedures into our business operations that we feel are appropriately calibrated to our machine learning and automation-driven operations, these policies and procedures may prove inadequate to manage our use of this nascent technology, resulting in a greater likelihood of inadvertent legal or compliance failures.

In addition, the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (“NAIC”) announced on July 23, 2020 the formation of a new Race and Insurance Special Committee (the “Special Committee”). The Special Committee is tasked with analyzing the level of diversity and inclusion within the insurance sector, identifying current practices in the insurance industry that disadvantage minorities and making recommendations to increase diversity and inclusion within the insurance sector and address practices that disadvantage minorities. The Special Committee may look into strengthening the unfair discrimination laws, such as prohibiting the use of credit scores in the underwriting of auto insurance. Any new unfair discrimination legislation that would prohibit us from using data that we currently use or plan to use in the future to underwrite insurance could negatively impact our business.

Regulators may also require us to disclose the external data we use, algorithms and/or predictive matters prior to approving our underwriting models and rates. Such disclosures could put our intellectual property at risk.

Additionally, existing laws, such as the California Consumer Privacy Act (the “CCPA”), future and recently adopted laws, such as the California Privacy Rights Act (“CRPA”), and evolving attitudes about privacy protection may impair our ability to collect, use, and maintain data points of sufficient type or quantity to develop and train our algorithms. If such laws or regulations were enacted federally or in a large number of states in which we operate, it could impact the integrity and quality of our pricing and underwriting processes.

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We depend on search engines, social media platforms, digital app stores, content-based online advertising and other online sources to attract consumers to our website and our mobile app both rapidly and cost-effectively. If these third parties change their listings or increase their pricing, if our relationship with them deteriorates or terminates, or due to other factors beyond our control, we may be unable to attract new customers rapidly and cost-effectively, which would adversely affect our business and results of operations.

Our success depends on our ability to attract consumers to our website and our mobile app and convert them into customers in a rapid and cost-effective manner. We depend in large part on search engines, social media platforms, digital app stores, content-based online advertising and other online sources for traffic to our website and our mobile app, which are material sources for new consumers.

With respect to search engines, we are included in search results as a result of both paid search listings, where we purchase specific search terms that result in the inclusion of our advertisement, and free search listings, which depend on algorithms used by search engines. For paid search listings, if one or more of the search engines or other online sources on which we rely for purchased listings modifies or terminates its relationship with us, our expenses could rise if we are required to pay a higher price for such listings or if the alternatives we find are more expensive, or we could lose consumers and traffic to our website could decrease, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. For free search listings, if search engines on which we rely for algorithmic listings modify their algorithms, our websites may appear less prominently or not at all in search results, which could result in reduced traffic to our websites, as a result of which we might attract fewer new customers.

Our ability to maintain or increase the number of consumers who purchase our products after being directed to our website or our mobile app from other digital platforms depends on many factors that are not within our control. Search engines, social media platforms and other online sources often revise their algorithms and introduce new advertising products. If one or more of the search engines or other online sources on which we rely for traffic to our website and our mobile app were to modify its general methodology for how it displays our advertisements or keyword search results, resulting in fewer consumers clicking through to our website and our mobile app, our business and operating results are likely to suffer. In addition, if our online display advertisements are no longer effective or are not able to reach certain consumers due to consumers’ use of ad-blocking software, our business and operating results could suffer.

Additionally, changes in regulations could limit the ability of search engines and social media platforms, including but not limited to Google and Facebook, to collect data from users and engage in targeted advertising, making them less effective in disseminating our advertisements to our target customers. For example, the proposed Designing Accounting Safeguards to Help Broaden Oversight and Regulations on Data (“DASHBOARD”) Act would mandate annual disclosure to the SEC of the type and “aggregate value” of user data used by harvesting companies, such as Facebook, Google and Amazon, including how revenue is generated by user data and what measures are taken to protect the data. If the costs of advertising on search engines and social media platforms increase, we may incur additional marketing expenses or be required to allocate a larger portion of our marketing spend to other channels and our business and operating results could be adversely affected. Similarly, changes to regulations applicable to the insurance brokerage and distribution business may limit our ability to rely on key distribution platforms, if the third-party distribution platforms are unable to continue to distribute our insurance products without an insurance producer license pursuant to applicable insurance law and regulations.

The marketing of our insurance products depends on our ability to cultivate and maintain cost-effective and otherwise satisfactory relationships with digital app stores, in particular, those operated by Google and Apple. As we grow, we may struggle to maintain cost-effective marketing strategies, and our customer acquisition costs could rise substantially. Furthermore, because many of our customers access our insurance products through a mobile app, we depend on the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store to distribute our mobile app.

Operating system platforms and application stores controlled by third parties, such as Apple and Google, may change their terms of service or policies in a manner that increases our costs or impacts our ability to distribute our mobile app, collect data through it, and market our products.

We are subject to the terms of service and policies governing the operating system platforms on which our mobile app runs and the application stores through which we distribute our mobile app, such as those operated by Apple and Google. These terms of service and policies govern the distribution, operation and promotion of

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applications on such platforms and stores. These platforms and stores have broad discretion to change and interpret their terms of service and policies in a manner that may adversely affect our business. For example, an operating system platform or application store may increase fees associated with access to it, restrict the collection of data through mobile apps that run on those platforms, restrict how that data is used and shared, and limit how mobile app publishers advertise online.

We rely on telematics to collect data points from an OBD-II device in customers’ vehicles. This data is used to accurately bill the miles they have driven, evaluate pricing and underwriting risks, manage claims and customer support, and improve business processes. Limitations on our ability to collect, use or share telematics and other data derived from the OBD-II device, as well as new technologies that block our ability to collect, use or share such data, could significantly diminish the value of our platform and have an adverse effect on our ability to generate revenue. Limitations or blockages on our ability to collect, use or share data derived from use of our mobile app may also restrict our ability to analyze such data to facilitate our product improvement, research and development and advertising activities. For example, in June 2020, Apple announced plans to require applications using its mobile operating systems to obtain an end-user’s permission to track them or access their device’s advertising identifier for advertising and advertising measurement purposes, as well as other restrictions that could adversely affect our business.

If we were to violate, or be perceived to have violated, the terms of service or policies of an operating system platform or application store, the provider may limit or block our access to it. It is possible that an operating system platform or application store might limit, eliminate or otherwise interfere with the distribution of our mobile app, the features we provide and the manner in which we market our mobile app, or give preferential treatment on their platforms or stores to a competitor. To the extent either or both of them do so, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected.

Furthermore, one of the factors we use to evaluate our customer satisfaction and market position is our Apple App Store ratings. This rating, however, may not be a reliable indicator of our customer satisfaction relative to other companies who are rated on the Apple App Store since, to date, we have received a fraction of the number of reviews of some of the companies we benchmark against, and thus our number of positive reviews may not be as meaningful.

Our indebtedness subjects us to additional financial and operating restrictions.

In April 2020, Legacy Metromile entered into that certain Note Purchase and Security Agreement (as amended, the “Note Purchase Agreement”) with Legacy Metromile, as issuer, the company and certain subsidiaries of Legacy Metromile, as guarantors, and certain affiliates of Hudson Structured Capital Management (collectively, “Hudson”), as purchasers and the collateral agent. The Note Purchase Agreement was amended in February 2021 to reflect the consummation of the Merger to add the Company as a guarantor and reflect our new corporate structure. Under the Note Purchase Agreement, as amended we may issue up to $50.0 million in aggregate principal amount of senior secured subordinated PIK notes due 2025 (the “Notes”). As of September 30, 2020, $27.5 million aggregate principal amount of the Notes was outstanding, none of which was capitalized interest. The Note Purchase Agreement contains various covenants that, among other things, our ability and/or our restricted subsidiaries’ ability to:

•        incur or assume liens or additional debt or provide guarantees in respect of obligations of other persons;

•        pay dividends or distributions or redeem or repurchase capital stock;

•        prepay, redeem or repurchase certain debt;

•        make loans, investments and acquisitions;

•        sell assets and capital stock of our subsidiaries; and

•        consolidate or merge with or into, or sell substantially all of our assets to, another person.

The Note Purchase Agreement, as amended, also includes certain financial covenants that require us to maintain a minimum amount of unrestricted cash. Those covenants could adversely affect our financial health and business and future operations by, among other things:

•        making it more difficult to satisfy its obligations;

•        limiting our ability to refinance our debt on terms acceptable to us or at all;

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•        limiting our flexibility to plan for and adjust to changing business and market conditions and increasing our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions;

•        limiting our ability to use our available cash flow to fund future acquisitions and to make dividend payments; and

•        limiting our ability to obtain additional financing for working capital, to fund growth or for general corporate purposes, even when necessary to maintain adequate liquidity.

Furthermore, the Notes are secured by substantially all of our and certain of our subsidiaries’ assets, including intellectual property. Our failure to comply with any of the covenants under the Note Purchase Agreement, as amended, could result in an event of default, If an event of default under such indebtedness occurs and is continuing, the holders of the Notes may request the acceleration of the related debt and foreclose on the underlying security interests.

Our expansion within the United States will subject us to additional costs and risks, and our plans may not be successful.

Our success depends in significant part on our ability to expand into additional markets in the United States and abroad. We are currently licensed in the District of Columbia and 49 states of the United States and operate in eight of those states. We plan to have a presence in almost all states by 2022 but cannot guarantee that we will be able to provide nationwide coverage on that timeline or at all. Moreover, one or more states could revoke our license to operate, or implement additional regulatory hurdles that could preclude or inhibit our ability to obtain or maintain our license in such states. As we seek to expand in the United States, we may incur significant operating expenses, although our expansion may not be successful for a variety of reasons, including because of:

•        barriers to obtaining the required government approvals, licenses or other authorizations;

•        failures in identifying and entering into joint ventures with strategic partners, both domestically and internationally, or entering into joint ventures that do not produce the desired results;

•        challenges in, and the cost of, complying with various laws and regulatory standards, including with respect to the insurance business and insurance distribution, capital and outsourcing requirements, data privacy, tax, claims handling, and local regulatory restrictions;

•        difficulty in recruiting and retaining licensed, talented and capable employees;

•        competition from local incumbents that already own market share, better understand the local market, may market and operate more effectively and may enjoy greater local affinity or awareness;

•        differing demand dynamics, which may make our product offerings less successful; or

•        currency exchange restrictions or costs and exchange rate fluctuations, or significant increases to import tariffs.

Expansion into new markets in the United States will also require additional investments by us both in marketing and with respect to securing applicable regulatory approvals. These incremental costs may result from hiring additional personnel, from engaging third-party service providers and from incurring other research and development costs. If we invest substantial time and resources to expand our operations while our revenues from those additional operations do not exceed the expense of establishing and maintaining them, or if we are unable to manage these risks effectively, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected.

If we fail to grow our geographic footprint or geographic growth occurs at a slower rate than expected, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be materially and adversely affected.

Our technology platform may not operate properly or as we expect it to operate.

We utilize our technology platform to gather customer data in order to determine whether or not to write and how to price our insurance products. Similarly, we use our technology platform to process many of our claims. Our technology platform is expensive and complex, its continuous development, maintenance and operation may entail

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unforeseen difficulties including material performance problems or undetected defects or errors. We may encounter technical obstacles, and it is possible that we may discover additional problems that prevent our technology from operating properly. If our platform does not function reliably, we may incorrectly select our customers, bill our customers, price insurance products or incorrectly pay or deny insurance claims made by our customers. These errors could result in inadequate insurance premiums paid relative to claims made, resulting in increased financial losses. These errors could also cause customer dissatisfaction with us, which could cause customers to cancel or fail to renew their insurance policies with us or make it less likely that prospective customers obtain new insurance policies from us. Additionally, technology platform errors may lead to unintentional bias and discrimination in the underwriting process, which could subject us to legal or regulatory liability and harm our brand and reputation. Any of these eventualities could result in a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We depend on third-party technology providers to support our telematics data acquisition.

We utilize telematics technology to gather data that we use to underwrite insurance policies, bill customers, and manage claims and customer service. Our telematics hardware is designed and manufactured and telematics data services are provided to us by third parties. These companies may fail to provide us accurate or complete data due to technical or operating failures, their hardware may have errors that inaccurately collect or represent driver behavior, car location, or other sensor data, or they may go stop offering their services to us. If we are delivered inaccurate or no data due to these failures, we may overpay claims, underbill customers, or create customer dissatisfaction that causes customers to cancel their insurance policies with us. Any of these eventualities could result in a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Regulatory changes may limit our ability to develop or implement our telematics-based pricing model and/or may eliminate or restrict the confidentiality of our proprietary technology.

Our future success depends on our ability to continue to develop and implement our telematics-based pricing model, and to maintain the confidentiality of our proprietary technology. Changes to existing laws, their interpretation or implementation, or new laws could impede our use of this technology, or require that we disclose our proprietary technology to our competitors, which could negatively impact our competitive position and result in a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, and financial condition. For example, the November 2020 ballot measure in California, which was formally adopted, will enact the CPRA, which mandates issuance of regulations providing California residents with the right to information about the logic of certain algorithmic decisions about them and the right to opt-out of such decisions. Such regulations, and similar laws that could be enacted in other states, could require disclosure of our proprietary technology, limit the effectiveness of our products and reduce demand for them.

Our brand may not become as widely known or accepted as incumbents’ brands or the brand may become tarnished.

Many of our competitors have brands that are well-recognized. As a relatively new entrant into the insurance market, we have spent, and expect that we will for the foreseeable future continue to spend, considerable amounts of money and other resources on creating brand awareness and building our reputation. We may not be able to build brand awareness to levels matching our competitors, and our efforts at building, maintaining and enhancing our reputation could fail and/or may not be cost-effective. Complaints or negative publicity about our business practices, our marketing and advertising campaigns (including marketing affiliations or partnerships), our compliance with applicable laws, the integrity of the data that we provide to consumers or business partners, data privacy and security issues, and other aspects of our business, whether real or perceived, could diminish confidence in our brand, which could adversely affect our reputation and business. As we expand our product offerings and enter new markets, we will need to establish our reputation with new customers, and to the extent we are not successful in creating positive impressions, our business in these newer markets could be adversely affected. While we may choose to engage in a broader marketing campaign to further promote our brand, this effort may not be successful or cost effective. If we are unable to maintain or enhance our reputation or enhance consumer awareness of our brand in a cost-effective manner, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be materially adversely affected.

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We may not continue to grow at historical rates or achieve or maintain profitability in the future.

Our limited operating history may make it difficult to evaluate our current business and our future prospects. While our revenue has grown in recent periods, this growth rate may not be sustainable and should not be considered indicative of future performance, and we may not realize sufficient revenue to achieve or maintain profitability. As we grow our business, we expect our revenue growth rates may slow in future periods due to a number of reasons, which may include slowing demand for our service, increasing competition, a decrease in the growth of our overall market, and our failure to capitalize on growth opportunities or the maturation of our business. We have incurred net losses on an annual basis since our inception, and may incur significant losses in the future for a number of reasons, including insufficient growth in the number of customers, a failure to retain our existing customers, and increasing competition, as well as other risks described in these Risk Factors, and we may encounter unforeseen expenses, difficulties, complications and delays and other unknown factors. We expect to continue to make investments in the development and expansion of our business, which may not result in increased or sufficient revenue or growth, as a result of which we may not be able to achieve or maintain profitability.

We expect a number of factors to cause our results of operations to fluctuate on a quarterly and annual basis, which may make it difficult to predict our future performance.

Our revenue and results of operations could vary significantly from quarter to quarter and year to year, and may fail to match periodic expectations as a result of a variety of factors, many of which are outside of our control. Our results may vary from period to period as a result of fluctuations in the number of customers purchasing our insurance products and renewing their agreements with us as well as fluctuations in the timing and amount of our expenses. In addition, the insurance industry is subject to its own cyclical trends and uncertainties, including extreme weather which is often seasonal and may result in volatility in claims reporting and payment patterns. Fluctuations and variability across the industry may also affect our revenue. As a result, comparing our results of operations on a period-to-period basis may not be meaningful, and the results of any one period should not be relied on as an indication of future performance. Our results of operations may not meet the expectations of investors or public market analysts who follow us, which may adversely affect our stock price. In addition to other risks described in these Risk Factors, and elsewhere in this registration statement, factors that may contribute to the variability of our quarterly and annual results include:

•        our ability to attract new customers and retain existing customers, including in a cost-effective manner;

•        our ability to accurately forecast revenue and losses and appropriately plan our expenses;

•        our ability to develop and offer new products, including in a cost-effective manner;

•        the effects of changes in search engine placement and prominence;

•        the effects of increased competition on our business;

•        our ability to successfully maintain our position in and expand in existing markets as well as successfully enter new markets;

•        our ability to protect our existing intellectual property and to create new intellectual property;

•        our ability to maintain an adequate rate of growth and effectively manage that growth;

•        our ability to keep pace with technology changes in the insurance, mobile and automobile industries;

•        the success of our sales and marketing efforts;

•        costs associated with defending claims, including accident and coverage claims, intellectual property infringement claims, misclassifications and related judgments or settlements;

•        the impact of, and changes in, governmental or other regulation affecting our business;

•        the attraction and retention of qualified employees and key personnel;

•        our ability to choose and effectively manage third-party service providers;

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•        our ability to identify and engage in joint ventures and strategic partnerships, both domestically and internationally;

•        the effects of natural or man-made catastrophic events;

•        the effectiveness of our internal controls; and

•        changes in our tax rates or exposure to additional tax liabilities.

We rely on highly skilled and experienced personnel and if we are unable to attract, retain or motivate key personnel or hire qualified personnel, our business may be seriously harmed. In addition, the loss of key senior management personnel could harm our business and future prospects.

Our performance largely depends on the talents and efforts of highly-skilled and experienced individuals. Our future success depends on our continuing ability to identify, hire, develop, motivate and retain highly skilled and experienced personnel and, if we are unable to hire and train a sufficient number of qualified employees for any reason, we may not be able to maintain or implement our current initiatives or grow, or our business may contract and we may lose market share. Moreover, certain of our competitors or other insurance or technology businesses may seek to hire our employees. We cannot assure you that our equity incentives and other compensation will provide adequate incentives to attract, retain and motivate employees in the future, particularly if the market price of our Common Stock does not increase or declines. If we do not succeed in attracting, retaining and motivating highly qualified personnel, our business may be seriously harmed.

We depend on our senior management, including Dan Preston, our Chief Executive Officer, and Paw Andersen, our Chief Technology Officer, as well as other key personnel. We may not be able to retain the services of any of our senior management or other key personnel, as their employment is at-will and they could leave at any time. If we lose the services of one or more of our senior management and other key personnel, including as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, we may not be able to successfully manage our business, meet competitive challenges or achieve our growth objectives. Further, to the extent that our business grows, we will need to attract and retain additional qualified management personnel in a timely manner, and we may not be able to do so. Our future success depends on our continuing ability to identify, hire, develop, motivate, retain and integrate highly skilled personnel in all areas of our organization.

New legislation or legal requirements may affect how we communicate with our customers, which could have a material adverse effect on our business model, financial condition, and results of operations.

State and federal lawmakers, insurance regulators, and advisory groups such as the NAIC are focusing upon the use of artificial intelligence broadly, including concerns about transparency, deception, and fairness in particular. Changes in laws or regulations, or changes in the interpretation of laws or regulations by a regulatory authority, specific to the use of artificial intelligence, may decrease our revenues and earnings and may require us to change the manner in which we conduct some aspects of our business. We may also be required to disclose our proprietary software to regulators, putting our intellectual property at risk, in order to receive regulatory approval to use such artificial intelligence in the underwriting of insurance and/or the payment of claims. In addition, our business and operations are subject to various U.S. federal, state, and local consumer protection laws, including laws which place restrictions on the use of automated tools and technologies to communicate with wireless telephone subscribers or consumers generally. For example, a California law, effective as of July 2019, makes it unlawful for any person to use a bot to communicate with a person in California online with the intent to mislead the other person about its artificial identity for the purpose of knowingly deceiving the person about the content of the communication in order to incentivize a purchase of goods or services in a commercial transaction. Although we have taken steps to mitigate our liability for violations of this and other laws restricting the use of electronic communication tools, no assurance can be given that we will not be exposed to civil litigation or regulatory enforcement. Further, to the extent that any changes in law or regulation further restrict the ways in which we communicate with prospective or current customers before or during onboarding, customer care, or claims management, these restrictions could result in a material reduction in our customer acquisition and retention, reducing the growth prospects of our business, and adversely affecting our financial condition and future cash flows.

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Severe weather events and other catastrophes, including the effects of climate change, are inherently unpredictable and may have a material adverse effect on our financial results and financial condition.

Our business may be exposed to catastrophic events such as tornadoes, tsunamis, tropical storms (including hurricanes), earthquakes, windstorms, hailstorms, severe thunderstorms, wildfires and other fires, as well as non-natural events such as explosions, riots, terrorism, or war, which could cause operating results to vary significantly from one period to the next. We may incur catastrophe losses in our business in excess of: (1) those experienced in prior years, (2) the average expected level used in pricing, (3) current reinsurance coverage limits, or (4) loss estimates from external tornado, hail, hurricane and earthquake models at various levels of probability. In addition, we are subject to customer insurance claims arising from weather events such as winter storms, rain, hail and high winds. The incidence and severity of weather conditions are largely unpredictable. There is generally an increase in the frequency and severity of customer insurance claims when severe weather conditions occur.

The incidence and severity of severe weather conditions and catastrophes are inherently unpredictable and the occurrence of one catastrophe does not render the possibility of another catastrophe greater or lower. The extent of losses from a catastrophe is a function of both the total amount of insured exposure in the area affected by the event and the severity of the event. In particular, severe weather and other catastrophes could significantly increase our costs due to a surge in claims following such events and/or legal and regulatory changes in response to catastrophes that may impair our ability to limit our liability under our policies. Severe weather conditions and catastrophes can cause greater losses for us, which can cause our liquidity and financial condition to deteriorate. Given our current state mix and performance of our book, we do not currently carry event reinsurance coverage for severe weather events. In addition, reinsurance placed in the market also carries some counterparty credit risk.

Climate change may affect the occurrence of certain natural events, such as an increase in the frequency or severity of wind and thunderstorm events, eruptions of volcanoes, and tornado or hailstorm events due to increased convection in the atmosphere; more frequent wildfires and subsequent landslides in certain geographies; higher incidence of deluge flooding and the potential for an increase in severity of the hurricane events due to higher sea surface temperatures. Additionally, climate change may cause an impact on the demand, price and availability of insurance, as well as the value of our investment portfolio. Due to significant variability associated with future changing climate conditions, we are unable to predict the impact climate change will have on our business.

Denial of claims or our failure to accurately and timely pay claims could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, brand and prospects.

Under the terms of our policies, we are required to accurately and timely evaluate and pay claims. Our ability to do so depends on a number of factors, including the efficacy of our claims processing, the training and experience of our claims adjusters, including our third-party claims administrators, and our ability to develop or select and implement appropriate procedures and systems to support our claims functions.

We believe that the speed at which our technology-based claims processing platform allows us to process and pay claims is a differentiating factor for our business relative to our competitors, and an increase in the average time to process claims could lead to customer dissatisfaction and undermine our reputation and position in the insurance marketplace. If our claims adjusters or third-party claims administrators are unable to effectively process our volume of claims, our ability to grow our business while maintaining high levels of customer satisfaction could be compromised, which in turn, could adversely affect our operating margins. Any failure to pay claims accurately or timely could also lead to regulatory and administrative actions or other legal proceedings and litigation against us, or result in damage to our reputation, any one of which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, brand and prospects.

Unexpected increases in the frequency or severity of claims may adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

Our business may experience volatility in claim frequency from time to time, and short-term trends may not continue over the longer term. Changes in claim frequency may result from changes in mix of business, miles driven, distracted driving, macroeconomic or other factors. A significant increase in claim frequency could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

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Changes in bodily injury claim severity are impacted by inflation in medical costs, litigation trends and precedents, regulation and the overall safety of automobile travel. Changes in auto property damage claim severity are driven primarily by inflation in the cost to repair vehicles, including parts and labor rates, the mix of vehicles that are declared total losses, model year mix as well as used car values. While actuarial models for pricing and reserving typically include an expected level of inflation, unanticipated increases in claim severity can arise from events that are inherently difficult to predict. Although we pursue various loss management initiatives to mitigate future increases in claim severity, there can be no assurances that these initiatives will successfully identify or reduce the effect of future increases in claim severity.

Failure to maintain our risk-based capital at the required levels could adversely affect our ability to maintain regulatory authority to conduct our business.

We are required to have sufficient capital and surplus in order to comply with insurance regulatory requirements, support our business operations and minimize our risk of insolvency. The NAIC has developed a system to test the adequacy of statutory capital and surplus of U.S.-based insurers, known as risk-based capital, that all states have adopted. This system establishes the minimum amount of capital and surplus necessary for an insurance company to support its overall business operations in consideration of its size and risk profile. It identifies insurers that may be inadequately capitalized by looking at certain risk factors, including asset risk, credit risk and underwriting risk with respect to the insurer’s business in order to determine an insurer’s authorized control level risk-based capital. An insurer’s risk-based capital ratio measures the relationship between its total adjusted capital and its authorized control level risk-based capital.

Insurers with a ratio falling below certain calculated thresholds may be subject to varying degrees of regulatory action, including heightened supervision, examination, rehabilitation or liquidation. An insurance company with total adjusted capital that is less than 200% of its authorized control level risk-based capital is at a company action level, which would require the insurance company to file a risk-based capital plan that, among other things, contains proposals of corrective actions the company intends to take that are reasonably expected to result in the elimination of the company action level event. Additional action level events occur when the insurer’s total adjusted capital falls below 150%, 100% and 70% of its authorized control level risk-based capital. Lower percentages trigger increasingly severe regulatory responses. In the event of a mandatory control level event (triggered when an insurer’s total adjusted capital falls below 70% of its authorized control level risk-based capital), an insurer’s primary regulator is required to take steps to place the insurer into receivership. As part of its regulatory review and approval of this transaction, the Delaware DOI required us to enter into a Capital Maintenance Agreement (the “CMA”). The CMA requires us, if the transaction closes, to ensure that the regulated insurance subsidiary, Metromile Insurance Company, will have and maintain total adjusted capital in an amount equal to at least 300% of the insurance company’s authorized control level risk based capital from the close of the transaction until a date to be determined by the regulator in mid-2025. Being required to maintain capital levels above the statutory requirement could put constraints on our ability to deploy capital to which our competitors are not subject.

In addition, the NAIC Insurance Regulatory Information System (the “IRIS”), is a collection of analytical tools designed to provide state insurance regulators with an integrated approach to screening and analyzing the financial condition of insurance companies operating in their respective states. If our ratios fall outside of the usual range for one or more ratios set forth by the IRIS for any number of reasons, it could subject us to heightened regulatory scrutiny or measures, or create investor uncertainty around the stability of our financial condition, which could harm our business.

Further, the NAIC has promulgated a Model Regulation to Define Standards and Commissioner’s Authority for Companies Deemed to be in Hazardous Financial Condition (the “Hazardous Financial Condition Standards”), which has been adopted by many states in whole or part. If our financial condition is deemed by state insurance regulators to meet the Hazardous Financial Conditions Standards, it could subject us to heightened regulatory scrutiny or measures, or create uncertainty around the stability of our financial condition, which could harm our business.

As a relatively new entrant to the insurance industry, we may face additional capital and surplus requirements as compared to those of our larger and more established competitors. Failure to maintain adequate risk-based capital at the levels required by law and/or the Delaware Department of Insurance as described above could result in increasingly onerous reporting and examination requirements and could adversely affect our ability to maintain regulatory authority to conduct our business.

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New or changing technologies, including those impacting personal transportation, could cause a disruption in our business model, which may materially impact our results of operations and financial condition.

If we fail to anticipate the impact on our business of changing technology, including automotive technology, our ability to successfully operate may be materially impaired. Our business could also be affected by potential technological changes, such as autonomous or partially autonomous vehicles or technologies that facilitate ride, car or home sharing, or vehicles with built-in telematics features. Such changes could disrupt the demand for products from current customers, create coverage issues or impact the frequency or severity of losses, or reduce the size of the automobile insurance market, causing our business to decline. Since auto insurance constitutes substantially all of our current business, we are more sensitive than other insurers and more adversely affected by trends that could decrease auto insurance rates or reduce demand for auto insurance over time. We may not be able to respond effectively to these changes, which could have a material effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

Security incidents, or real or perceived errors, failures or bugs in our systems, website or app could impair our operations, compromise our confidential information or our customers’ personal information, damage our reputation and brand, and harm our business and operating results.

Our continued success depends on our systems, applications, and software continuing to operate and to meet the changing needs of our customers and users. We rely on our technology and engineering staff and vendors to successfully implement changes to and maintain our systems and services in an efficient and secure manner. Like all information systems and technology, our website and mobile app may contain or develop material errors, failures, vulnerabilities or bugs, particularly when new features or capabilities are released, and may be subject to computer viruses or malicious code, break-ins, phishing impersonation attacks, attempts to overload our servers with denial-of-service or other attacks, ransomware and similar incidents or disruptions from unauthorized use of our computer systems, as well as unintentional incidents causing data leakage, any of which could lead to interruptions, delays or website or mobile app shutdowns.

Operating our business and products involves the collection, storage, use and transmission of sensitive, proprietary and confidential information, including personal information, pertaining to our current, prospective and past customers, staff, contractors, and business partners. The security measures we take to protect this information may be breached as a result of computer malware, viruses, social engineering, ransomware attacks, hacking and cyberattacks, including by state-sponsored and other sophisticated organizations. Such incidents have become more prevalent in recent years. For example, attempts to fraudulently induce our personnel into disclosing usernames, passwords or other information that can be used to access our systems and the information in them have increased and could be successful. Our security measures could also be compromised by our personnel, theft or errors, or be insufficient to prevent exploitation of security vulnerabilities in software or systems on which we rely. Such incidents have in the past resulted in unauthorized access to certain personal information, and may in the future result in unauthorized, unlawful or inappropriate use, destruction or disclosure of, access to, or inability to access the sensitive, proprietary and confidential information that we handle. These incidents may remain undetected for extended periods of time.

We rely on third-party service providers to provide critical services that help us deliver our solutions and operate our business. These providers may support or operate critical business systems for us or store or process the same sensitive, proprietary and confidential information that we handle. These service providers may not have adequate security measures and could experience a security incident that compromises the confidentiality, integrity or availability of the systems they operate for us or the information they process on our behalf. Such occurrences could adversely affect our business to the same degree as if we had experienced these occurrences directly and we may not have recourse to the responsible third-party service providers for the resulting liability we incur.

Because there are many different cybercrime and hacking techniques and such techniques continue to evolve, we may be unable to anticipate attempted security breaches, react in a timely manner or implement adequate preventative measures. While we have developed systems and processes designed to protect the integrity, confidentiality and security of our and our customers’ confidential and personal information under our control, we cannot assure you that any security measures that we or our third-party service providers have implemented will be effective against current or future security threats.

A security breach or other security incident of our systems, data, website or app has occurred in the past, and may occur in the future. For example, in January 2021, we discovered a security incident related to our online pre-filled quote form and application process, which resulted in unknown person(s) accessing personal information

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of certain individuals, including individuals’ driver’s license numbers. An actual security breach or incident, a material vulnerability, or the perception that one has occurred or exists, could result in a loss of customer confidence in the security of our platform and damage to our reputation and brand; reduce demand for our insurance products; disrupt normal business operations; require us to expend significant capital and resources to investigate and remedy the incident, and prevent recurrence and comply with any breach notification obligations; and subject us to litigation (including class actions), regulatory enforcement action, fines, penalties, and other liability, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Even if we take steps that we believe are adequate to protect us from cyber threats, hacking against our competitors or other companies in our industry could create the perception among our customers or potential customers that our digital platform is not safe to use. Security incidents could also damage our IT systems and our ability to make the financial reports and other public disclosures required of public companies. These risks are likely to increase as we continue to grow and process, store and transmit an increasingly large volume of data.

We may be unable to prevent, monitor or detect fraudulent activity, including policy acquisitions or payments of claims that are fraudulent in nature.

If we fail to maintain adequate systems and processes to prevent, monitor and detect fraud, including fraudulent policy acquisitions or claims activity, or if inadvertent errors occur with such prevention, monitoring and detection systems due to human or computer error, our business could be materially adversely impacted. While we believe past incidents of fraudulent activity have been relatively isolated, we cannot be certain that our systems and processes will always be adequate in the face of increasingly sophisticated and ever-changing fraud schemes. We use a variety of tools to protect against fraud, but these tools may not always be successful at preventing such fraud.

Instances of fraud may result in increased costs, including possible settlement and litigation expenses, and could have a material adverse effect on our business and reputation. In addition, failure to monitor and detect fraud and otherwise comply with state Special Investigation Unit requirements can result in regulatory fines or penalties.

We are subject to stringent and changing privacy and data security laws, regulations, and standards related to data privacy and security. Our actual or perceived failure to comply with such obligations could harm our reputation, subject us to significant fines and liability, or adversely affect our business.

In the U.S., insurance companies are subject to the privacy provisions of the federal Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act and the NAIC Insurance Information and Privacy Protection Model Act, to the extent adopted and implemented by various state legislatures and insurance regulators. The regulations implementing these laws require insurance companies to disclose their privacy practices to consumers, allow them to opt-in or opt-out, depending on the state, of the sharing of certain personal information with unaffiliated third parties, and maintain certain security controls to protect their information. Violators of these laws face regulatory enforcement action, substantial civil penalties, injunctions, and in some states, private lawsuits for damages.

Privacy and data security regulation in the U.S. is rapidly evolving. For example, California recently enacted the CCPA, which became effective January 1, 2020. The CCPA and related regulations give California residents expanded rights to access and request deletion of their personal information, opt out of certain personal information sharing, and receive detailed information about how their personal information is used and shared. The CCPA provides for civil penalties for violations, as well as a private right of action for certain data breaches, which is expected to increase the volume and success of class action data breach litigation. In addition to increasing our compliance costs and potential liability, the CCPA’s restrictions on “sales” of personal information may restrict our use of cookies and similar technologies for advertising purposes. The CCPA excludes information covered by Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, the Driver’s Privacy Protection Act, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, or the California Financial Information Privacy Act from the CCPA’s scope, but the CCPA’s definition of “personal information” is broad and may encompass other information that we maintain. Some observers have noted that the CCPA could mark the beginning of a trend toward more stringent privacy legislation in the U.S., and multiple states have enacted or proposed similar laws. There is also discussion in Congress of new comprehensive federal data protection and privacy law to which we likely would be subject if it is enacted.

In addition, California voters approved the November 2020 ballot measure which will enact the CPRA, substantially expanding the requirements of the CCPA. As of January 1, 2023, the CPRA will give consumers the ability to limit use of precise geolocation information and other categories of information classified as “sensitive”;

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add e-mail addresses and passwords to the list of personal information that, if lost or breached, would give the affected consumers the right to bring private lawsuits; increase the maximum penalties threefold for violations concerning consumers under age 16; and establish the California Privacy Protection Agency to implement and enforce the new law, as well as impose administrative fines. The effects of the CCPA, CPRA and other similar state or federal laws are potentially significant and may require us to modify our data processing practices and policies, incur substantial compliance costs and subject us to increased potential liability.

In addition to privacy and data security requirements under applicable laws, we are subject to the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard, or PCI DSS, a self-regulatory standard that requires companies that process payment card data to implement certain data security measures. If we or our payment processors fail to comply with the PCI DSS, we may incur significant fines or liability and lose access to major payment card systems. Industry groups may in the future adopt additional self-regulatory standards by which we are legally or contractually bound.

If we expand into Europe, we may also face particular privacy, data security, and data protection risks in connection with requirements of the General Data Protection Regulation (E.U.) 2016/679, or GDPR, and other data protection regulations. Among other stringent requirements, the GDPR restricts transfers of data outside of the E.U. to countries deemed to lack adequate privacy protections (such as the U.S.), unless an appropriate safeguard specified by the GDPR is implemented. A July 16, 2020 decision of the Court of Justice of the European Union invalidated a key mechanism for lawful data transfer to the U.S. and called into question the viability of its primary alternative. As such, the ability of companies to lawfully transfer personal data from the E.U. to the U.S. is presently uncertain. Other countries have enacted or are considering enacting similar cross-border data transfer rules or data localization requirements. These developments could limit our ability to deliver our products in the E.U. and other foreign markets. In addition, any failure or perceived failure to comply with these rules may result in regulatory fines or penalties including orders that require us to change the way we process data.

Additionally, we are subject to the terms of our privacy policies, privacy-related disclosures, and contractual and other privacy-related obligations to our customers and other third parties. Any failure or perceived failure by us or third parties we work with to comply with these policies, disclosures, and obligations to customers or other third parties, or privacy or data security laws may result in governmental or regulatory investigations, enforcement actions, regulatory fines, criminal compliance orders, litigation or public statements against us by consumer advocacy groups or others, and could cause customers to lose trust in us, all of which could be costly and have an adverse effect on our business.

We rely on our mobile application to execute our business strategy. Government regulation of the internet and the use of mobile applications in particular is evolving, and unfavorable changes could seriously harm our business.

We rely on our mobile application to execute our business strategy. We are subject to general business regulations and laws as well as federal and state regulations and laws specifically governing the internet and the use of mobile applications in particular. Existing and future laws and regulations may impede the growth of the internet or other online services, and increase the cost of providing online services. These regulations and laws may involve taxes, tariffs, privacy and data security, anti-spam, content protection, electronic contracts and communications, electronic signatures and consents, consumer protection and social media marketing. It is at times not clear how existing laws governing issues such as property ownership, sales and other taxes and consumer privacy apply to the internet and the use of mobile applications in particular, as the vast majority of these laws were adopted prior to the advent of the internet and the use of mobile applications and do not contemplate or address the unique issues raised by the internet. It is possible that general business regulations and laws, or those specifically governing the internet and the use of mobile applications in particular, may be interpreted and applied in a manner that is inconsistent from one jurisdiction to another and may conflict with other rules or our practices. We cannot be sure that our practices have complied, currently comply or will comply fully with all such laws and regulations. Any failure, or perceived failure, by us to comply with any of these laws or regulations could result in damage to our reputation, a loss in business and proceedings or actions against us by governmental entities or others. Any such proceeding or action could hurt our reputation, force us to spend significant amounts in defense of these proceedings, distract our management, increase our costs of doing business and decrease the use of our mobile application or website by consumers and suppliers and may result in the imposition of monetary liability. We may also be contractually liable to indemnify and hold harmless third parties from the costs or consequences of non-compliance with any such laws or regulations.

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Our intellectual property rights are valuable, and any inability to protect them could reduce the value of our products, services and brand.

Our trade secrets, trademarks, copyrights, patents, and other intellectual property rights are important assets for us. We rely on, and expect to continue to rely on, various agreements with our employees, independent contractors, consultants and third parties with whom we have relationships, as well as trademark, trade dress, domain name, copyright, patent, and trade secret laws, to protect our brand and other intellectual property rights. Such agreements may not effectively prevent unauthorized use or disclosure of our confidential information, intellectual property or technology and may not provide an adequate remedy in the event of unauthorized use or disclosure of our confidential information, intellectual property or technology, and we may fail to consistently obtain, police and enforce such agreements. Additionally, various factors outside our control pose a threat to our intellectual property rights, as well as to our products, services and technologies. For example, we may fail to obtain effective intellectual property protection, or effective intellectual property protection may not be available in every country in which our products and services are available. Also, the efforts we have taken to protect our intellectual property rights may not be sufficient or effective in all cases. For example, governmental entities that grant intellectual property rights may deny our applications for such rights despite our best efforts. Additionally, granted intellectual property rights are subject to challenge. Successful challenges may result in such rights being narrowed in scope or declared invalid or unenforceable. Despite our efforts to obtain and protect broad intellectual property rights, there can be no assurance our intellectual property rights will be sufficient to protect against others offering products or services that are substantially similar to ours and compete with our business, and unauthorized parties may attempt to copy aspects of our technology and use information that we consider proprietary. Competitors or other third parties may also attempt to circumvent or design around our intellectual property rights.

In addition to registered intellectual property rights such as trademark registrations, we rely on non-registered proprietary information and technology, such as trade secrets, confidential information, know-how and technical information. Certain information or technology that we endeavor to protect as trade secrets may not be eligible for trade secret protection in all jurisdictions, or the measures we undertake to establish and maintain such trade secret protection may be inadequate. In order to protect our proprietary information and technology, we rely in part on agreements with our employees, investors, independent contractors and other third parties that place restrictions on the use and disclosure of this intellectual property. In some cases, these agreements may not adequately protect our trade secrets, these agreements may be breached, or this intellectual property, including trade secrets, may otherwise be disclosed or become known to our competitors, which could cause us to lose a competitive advantage resulting from this intellectual property. However, our employees, independent contractors or other third parties with whom we do business may nonetheless use intellectual property owned by others in their work for us, and disputes may arise as to the rights in related or resulting know-how and inventions. Current or future legal requirements may require us to disclose certain proprietary information or technology, such as our proprietary algorithms, to regulators or other third parties, including our competitors, which could impair or result in the loss of trade secret protection for such information or technology. The loss of trade secret protection could make it easier for third parties to compete with our products and services by copying functionality. In addition, any changes in, or unexpected interpretations of, intellectual property laws may compromise our ability to enforce our trade secret and intellectual property rights. Costly and time-consuming litigation could be necessary to enforce and determine the scope of our proprietary rights, and failure to obtain or maintain protection of our trade secrets or other proprietary information could harm our business, results of operations and competitive position.

We have filed, and may continue in the future to file, applications to protect certain of our innovations and intellectual property. We do not know whether any of our applications will result in the issuance of a patent, trademark or copyright, as applicable, or whether the examination process will require us to narrow our claims or otherwise limit the scope of such intellectual property. In addition, we may not receive competitive advantages from the rights granted under our intellectual property. Our existing intellectual property, and any intellectual property granted to us or that we otherwise acquire in the future, may be contested, circumvented or invalidated, and we may not be able to prevent third parties from infringing our intellectual property rights. Therefore, the exact effect of the protection of this intellectual property cannot be predicted with certainty. Because obtaining patent protection requires disclosing our inventions to the public, such disclosure may facilitate our competitors developing improvements to our innovations. Given this risk, we may sometimes choose not to seek patent protection for certain innovations and instead rely on trade secret protection. Any failure to adequately obtain such patent protection, or other intellectual property protection, could later prove to adversely impact our business.

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We currently hold various domain names relating to our brand, including Metromile.com. Failure to protect our domain names could adversely affect our reputation and brand and make it more difficult for users to find our website and our mobile app. We may be unable, without significant cost or at all, to prevent third parties from acquiring domain names that are similar to, infringe upon or otherwise decrease the value of our trademarks and other proprietary rights.

We may be required to spend significant resources in order to monitor and protect our intellectual property rights, and some violations may be difficult or impossible to detect. For example, infringement of patent rights related to internal software processes may be difficult to detect. Litigation to protect and enforce our intellectual property rights could be costly, time-consuming and distracting to management and could result in the impairment or loss of portions of our intellectual property. Our efforts to enforce our intellectual property rights may be met with defenses, counterclaims and countersuits attacking the validity and enforceability of our intellectual property rights or asserting that we infringe third-party intellectual property rights. The unauthorized copying or use of our proprietary technology, as well as any costly litigation or diversion of our management’s attention and resources, could impair the functionality of our platform, delay introductions of enhancements to our platform, result in our substituting inferior or more costly technologies into our platform or harm our reputation or brand. In addition, we may be required to license additional technology from third parties to develop and market new offerings or platform features, which may not be on commercially reasonable terms or at all and could adversely affect our ability to compete.

Although we take measures to protect our intellectual property, if we are unable to prevent the unauthorized use or exploitation of our intellectual property, the value of our brand, content, and other intangible assets may be diminished, competitors may be able to more effectively mimic our service and methods of operations, the perception of our business and service to customers and potential customers may become confused, and our ability to attract customers may be adversely affected. Any failure to protect our intellectual property could adversely impact our business, results of operations and financial condition. While we take precautions designed to protect our intellectual property, it may still be possible for competitors and other unauthorized third parties to copy our technology and use our proprietary brand, content and information to create or enhance competing solutions and services, which could adversely affect our competitive position in our rapidly evolving and highly competitive industry. Some license provisions that protect against unauthorized use, copying, transfer and disclosure of our technology may be unenforceable under the laws of certain jurisdictions and foreign countries. While we enter into confidentiality and invention assignment agreements with our employees and consultants and enter into confidentiality agreements with our third-party providers and strategic partners, we cannot assure you that these agreements will be effective in controlling access to, and use and distribution of, our products and proprietary information. Further, these agreements do not prevent our competitors from independently developing technologies that are substantially equivalent or superior to our offerings.

Some of our products and services contain open source software, which may pose particular risks to our proprietary software, products, and services in a manner that could have a negative effect on our business.

We use open source software in our products and services and anticipate continuing to use open source software in the future. Some open source software licenses require those who distribute open source software as part of their own software product to publicly disclose all or part of the source code of such software product or to make available any derivative works of the open source code on unfavorable terms or at no cost, and we may be subject to such terms. The terms of certain open source licenses to which we are subject have not been interpreted by U.S. or foreign courts, and there is a risk that open source software licenses could be construed in a manner that imposes unanticipated conditions or restrictions on our ability to provide or distribute our products or services. Additionally, we could face claims from third parties claiming ownership of, or demanding release of, the open source software or derivative works that we develop using such software, which could include our proprietary source code, or otherwise seeking to enforce the terms of the applicable open source license. These claims could result in litigation and could require us to make our software source code freely available, purchase a costly license or cease offering the implicated products or services unless and until we can re-engineer such source code to eliminate use of such open source software. This re-engineering process could require us to expend significant additional research and development resources, and we may not be able to complete the re-engineering process successfully. In addition to risks related to license requirements, use of certain open source software can lead to greater risks than use of third-party commercial software, as open source licensors generally do not provide warranties, assurance of title or controls on the origin or operation of the open source software, which are risks that cannot be eliminated, and

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could, if not properly addressed, negatively affect our business. We have established processes to help alleviate these risks, including a review process for screening requests from our development teams for the use of open source software, but we cannot be sure that all of our use of open source software is in a manner that is consistent with our current policies and procedures, or will not subject us to liability. Any of these risks could be difficult to eliminate or manage, and, if not addressed, could have a negative effect on our business, financial condition and operating results.

Claims by others that we infringe or have infringed their proprietary technology or other intellectual property rights could harm our business.

Companies in the internet and technology industries are frequently subject to litigation based on allegations of infringement or other violations of intellectual property rights. In addition, certain companies and rights holders seek to enforce and monetize patents or other intellectual property rights they own, have purchased or have otherwise obtained. As we gain an increasingly high public profile, the possibility of intellectual property rights claims against us grows. From time to time, third parties may assert claims of infringement of intellectual property rights against us. Although we may have meritorious defenses, there can be no assurance that we will be successful in defending against these allegations or in reaching a business resolution that is satisfactory to us. Our competitors and others may now and in the future have significantly larger and more mature patent portfolios than us. In addition, future litigation may involve patent holding companies or other adverse patent owners who have no relevant product or service revenue and against whom our own patents may therefore provide little or no deterrence or protection. Many potential litigants, including some of our competitors and patent-holding companies, have the ability to dedicate substantial resources to the assertion of their intellectual property rights. Any claim of infringement by a third party, even those without merit, could cause us to incur substantial costs defending against the claim, could distract our management from our business and could require us to cease use of such intellectual property. Furthermore, because of the substantial amount of discovery required in connection with intellectual property litigation, we risk compromising our confidential information during this type of litigation. We may be required to pay substantial damages, royalties or other fees in connection with a claimant securing a judgment against us, we may be subject to an injunction or other restrictions that prevent us from using or distributing our intellectual property, or from operating under our brand, or we may agree to a settlement that prevents us from distributing our offerings or a portion thereof, which could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

With respect to any intellectual property rights claim, we may have to seek out a license to continue operations found or alleged to violate such rights, which may not be available, or if available, may not be available on favorable or commercially reasonable terms and may significantly increase our operating expenses. Some licenses may be non-exclusive, and therefore our competitors may have access to the same technology licensed to us. If a third party does not offer us a license to its intellectual property on reasonable terms, or at all, we may be required to develop alternative, non-infringing technology, which could require significant time (during which we would be unable to continue to offer our affected offerings), effort and expense and may ultimately not be successful. Any of these events could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We may be subject to compliance obligations arising from medical information privacy regulations.

By processing certain personal injury data on behalf of our clients, we may be subject to compliance obligations under privacy and data security-related laws specific to the protection of healthcare or medical information. Although we may be subject to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPAA”), the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (“HITECH Act”) and comparable state laws, we do not have a process in place to assess or align our privacy and security practices specifically against requirements for protecting medical information.

We may be unable to prevent or address the misappropriation of our data.

From time to time, third parties may misappropriate our data through website scraping, bots or other means and aggregate this data on their websites with data from other companies. In addition, copycat websites or mobile apps may misappropriate data and attempt to imitate our brand or the functionality of our website or our mobile app. If we become aware of such websites or mobile apps, we intend to employ technological or legal measures in an attempt to halt their operations. However, we may be unable to detect all such websites or mobile apps in a timely manner and, even if we could, technological and legal measures may be insufficient to halt their operations. In some cases, particularly in the case of websites or mobile apps operating outside of the U.S., our available remedies may

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not be adequate to protect us against the effect of the operation of such websites or mobile apps. Regardless of whether we can successfully enforce our rights against the operators of these websites or mobile apps, any measures that we may take could require us to expend significant financial or other resources, which could harm our business, results of operations or financial condition. In addition, to the extent that such activity creates confusion among consumers or advertisers, our brand and business could be harmed.

If our customers were to claim that the policies they purchased failed to provide adequate or appropriate coverage, we could face claims that could harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Although we aim to provide adequate and appropriate coverage under each of our policies, customers could purchase policies that prove to be inadequate or inappropriate. If such customers were to bring a claim or claims alleging that we failed in our responsibilities to provide them with the type or amount of coverage that they sought to purchase, we could be found liable for amounts significantly in excess of the policy limit, resulting in an adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. While we maintain errors and omissions insurance coverage to protect us against such liability, such coverage may be insufficient or inadequate.

If we are unable to underwrite risks accurately or charge competitive yet profitable rates to our customers, our business, results of operations and financial condition will be adversely affected.

In general, the premiums for our insurance policies are established at the time a policy is issued and, therefore, before all of our underlying costs are known. The accuracy of our pricing depends on our ability to adequately assess risks, estimate losses and comply with state insurance regulations. Like other insurance companies, we rely on estimates and assumptions in setting our premium rates. We also utilize the data that we gather through our interactions with our customers, as evaluated and curated by our technology-based pricing platform.

Establishing adequate premium rates is necessary, together with investment income, if any, to generate sufficient revenue to offset losses, LAE, and other costs. If we do not accurately assess the risks that we underwrite, the premiums that we charge may not be adequate to cover our losses and expenses, which would adversely affect our results of operations and our profitability. Moreover, if we determine that our prices are too low, insurance regulations may preclude us from being able to cancel insurance contracts, non-renew customers, or raise premiums. Alternatively, we could set our premiums too high, which could reduce our competitiveness and lead to fewer customers and lower revenues, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Pricing involves the acquisition and analysis of historical loss data and the projection of future trends, loss costs and expenses, and inflation trends, among other factors, for each of our products in multiple risk tiers and many different markets. In order to accurately price our policies, we must:

•        collect and properly analyze a substantial volume of data from our customers;

•        develop, test and apply appropriate actuarial projections and rating formulas;

•        review and evaluate competitive product offerings and pricing dynamics;

•        closely monitor and timely recognize changes in trends; and

•        project both frequency and severity of our customers’ losses with reasonable accuracy; and

•        in many states obtain regulatory approval for these processes and the resulting rates.

There are no assurances that we will have success in implementing our pricing methodology accurately in accordance with our assumptions. Our ability to accurately price our policies is subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, including:

•        insufficient or unreliable data;

•        incorrect or incomplete analysis of available data;

•        uncertainties generally inherent in estimates and assumptions;

•        our failure to implement appropriate actuarial projections and rating formulas or other pricing methodologies;

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•        incorrect or incomplete analysis of the competitive environment;

•        regulatory constraints on rate increases or the use of certain types of data; and

•        our failure to accurately estimate investment yields and the duration of our liability for loss and loss adjustment expenses, as well as unanticipated court decisions, legislation or regulatory action.

To address the potential inadequacy of our current business model, we may be compelled to increase the amount allocated to cover policy claims, increase premium rates or adopt tighter underwriting standards, any of which may result in a decline in new business and renewals and, as a result, could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Our product development cycles are complex and subject to regulatory approval, and we may incur significant expenses before we generate revenues, if any, from new products.

Because our products are highly technical and require rigorous testing and regulatory approvals, development cycles can be complex. Moreover, development projects can be technically challenging and expensive, and may be delayed or defeated by the inability to obtain licensing or other regulatory approvals. The nature of these development cycles may cause us to experience delays between the time we incur expenses associated with research and development and the time we generate revenues, if any, from such expenses. If we expend a significant amount of resources on research and development and our efforts do not lead to the successful introduction or improvement of products that are competitive in the marketplace, this could materially and adversely affect our business and results of operations. Additionally, anticipated customer demand for a product we are developing could decrease after the development cycle has commenced. Such decreased customer demand may cause us to fall short of our sales targets, and we may nonetheless be unable to avoid substantial costs associated with the product’s development. If we are unable to complete product development cycles successfully and in a timely fashion and generate revenues from such future products, the growth of our business may be harmed.

Litigation and legal proceedings filed by or against us and our subsidiaries could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

From time to time, we are subject to allegations, and may be party to litigation and legal proceedings relating to our business operations. Litigation and other proceedings may include complaints from or litigation by customers or reinsurers, related to alleged breaches of contract or otherwise. We expect that as our market share increases, competitors may pursue litigation to require us to change our business practices or offerings and limit our ability to compete effectively.

As is typical in the insurance industry, we continually face risks associated with litigation of various types arising in the normal course of our business operations, including disputes relating to insurance claims under our policies as well as other general commercial and corporate litigation. Although we are not currently involved in any material litigation with our customers, members of the insurance industry are periodically the target of class action lawsuits and other types of litigation, some of which involve claims for substantial or indeterminate amounts, and the outcomes of which are unpredictable. This litigation is based on a variety of issues, including sale of insurance and claim settlement practices. In addition, because we employ a technology platform to collect customer data, it is possible that customers or consumer groups could bring individual or class action claims alleging that our methods of collecting data and pricing risk are impermissibly discriminatory. We cannot predict with any certainty whether we will be involved in such litigation in the future or what impact such litigation would have on our business. If we were to be involved in litigation and it was determined adversely, it could require us to pay significant damages or to change aspects of our operations, either of which could have a material adverse effect on our financial results. Even claims without merit can be time-consuming and costly to defend, and may divert management’s attention and resources away from our business and adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. Additionally, routine lawsuits over claims that are not individually material could in the future become material if aggregated with a substantial number of similar lawsuits. In addition to increasing costs, a significant volume of customer complaints or litigation could also adversely affect our brand and reputation, regardless of whether such allegations have merit or whether we are liable. We cannot predict with certainty the costs of defense, the costs of prosecution, insurance coverage or the ultimate outcome of litigation or other proceedings filed by or against us, including remedies or damage awards, and adverse results in such litigation, and other proceedings may harm our business and financial condition.

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Our ability to utilize our net operating loss carryforwards and certain other tax attributes may be limited.

As of December 31, 2019, we had gross federal income tax net operating losses (“NOLs”), of approximately $235.7 million available to offset our future taxable income, if any, prior to consideration of annual limitations that may be imposed under Section 382 of the Code, or otherwise. Of our NOLs, $139.6 million of losses will begin to expire in 2031 through 2039 and $96.1 million of losses can be carried forward indefinitely.

We may be unable to fully use our NOLs, if at all. Under Section 382 of the Code, if a corporation undergoes an “ownership change” (very generally defined as a greater than 50% change, by value, in the corporation’s equity ownership by certain stockholders or groups of stockholders over a rolling three-year period), the corporation’s ability to use its pre-ownership change NOLs to offset its post-ownership change income may be limited. We have experienced ownership changes in the past, and we may experience ownership changes in the future as a result of subsequent shifts in our stock ownership, some of which may be outside of our control. Future regulatory changes could also limit our ability to utilize our NOLs. To the extent we are not able to offset future taxable income with our NOLs, our net income and cash flows may be adversely affected.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Act”), as modified by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”), among other things, includes changes to U.S. federal tax rates and the rules governing NOL carryforwards. For federal NOLs arising in tax years beginning after December 31, 2017, with certain exceptions, including for insurance companies that are not life insurance companies, the Tax Act as modified by the CARES Act limits a taxpayer’s ability to utilize NOL carryforwards in taxable years beginning after December 31, 2020 to 80% of taxable income. In addition, federal NOLs arising in tax years beginning after December 31, 2017, with an exception for insurance companies that are not life insurance companies, can be carried forward indefinitely. For federal NOLs for insurance companies that are not life insurance companies subject to taxation under Part 2 of subchapter L of the Code, NOLs may be carried forward for 20 taxable years regardless of when they arise. The income of insurance companies that are not life insurance companies is generally not subject to a percentage limitation for offset by group NOLs. Deferred tax assets for NOLs will need to be measured at the applicable tax rate in effect when the NOLs are expected to be utilized. The new limitation on use of NOLs may significantly impact our ability to utilize our NOLs to offset taxable income in the future. In addition, for state income tax purposes, there may be periods during which the use of net operating loss carryforwards is suspended or otherwise limited, which could accelerate or permanently increase state taxes owed. For example, California recently imposed limits on the usability of California state net operating losses to offset taxable income in tax years beginning after 2019 and before 2023.

Future acquisitions or investments could disrupt our business and harm our financial condition.

In the future we may pursue acquisitions or investments that we believe will help us achieve our strategic objectives. There is no assurance that such acquisitions or investments will perform as expected or will be successfully integrated into our business or generate substantial revenue, and we may overestimate cash flow, underestimate costs or fail to understand the risks of or related to any investment or acquired business. The process of acquiring a business, product or technology can also cause us to incur various expenses and create unforeseen operating difficulties, expenditures and other challenges, whether or not those acquisitions are consummated, such as:

•        intense competition for suitable acquisition targets, which could increase prices and adversely affect our ability to consummate deals on favorable or acceptable terms;

•        inadequacy of reserves for losses and loss adjustment expenses;

•        failure or material delay in closing a transaction, including as a result of regulatory review and approvals;

•        regulatory conditions attached to the approval of the acquisition and other regulatory hurdles;

•        a need for additional capital that was not anticipated at the time of the acquisition;

•        anticipated benefits not materializing or being lower than anticipated;

•        diversion of management time and focus from operating our business to addressing acquisition integration challenges;

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•        transition of the acquired company’s customers;

•        difficulties in integrating the technologies, operations, existing contracts and personnel of an acquired company;

•        retention of employees or business partners of an acquired company;

•        cultural challenges associated with integrating employees from the acquired company into our organization;

•        integration of the acquired company’s accounting, management information, human resources and other administrative systems;

•        the need to implement or improve controls, procedures and policies at a business that prior to the acquisition may have lacked effective controls, procedures and policies;

•        coordination of product development and sales and marketing functions;

•        theft of our trade secrets or confidential information that we share with potential acquisition candidates;

•        risk that an acquired company or investment in new offerings cannibalizes a portion of our existing business;

•        adverse market reaction to an acquisition;

•        liability for activities of the acquired company before the acquisition, including patent and trademark infringement claims, violations of laws, commercial disputes, tax liabilities and other known and unknown liabilities; and

•        litigation or other claims in connection with the acquired company, including claims from terminated employees, users, former stockholders or other third parties.

If we are unable to address these difficulties and challenges or other problems encountered in connection with any future acquisition or investment, we might not realize the anticipated benefits of that acquisition or investment and we might incur unanticipated liabilities or otherwise suffer harm to our business generally.

To the extent that we pay the consideration for any future acquisitions or investments in cash, it would reduce the amount of cash available to us for other purposes. Future acquisitions or investments could also result in dilutive issuances of our equity securities or the incurrence of debt, contingent liabilities, amortization expenses, increased interest expenses or impairment charges against goodwill on our consolidated balance sheet, any of which could seriously harm our business.

Our enterprise software business unit has limited operating history, which makes it difficult to forecast operating results from the business unit, and we may not achieve the expected operating results in the future.

We established the enterprise software business unit in 2018 and signed its first customer the same year. Since then, we have seen a growth in revenue and deployments. However, as a result of its limited operating history, our ability to forecast future operating results from this business unit, including revenues, cash flows and profitability, is limited and subject to many uncertainties. The historical revenue growth in this business unit should not be considered indicative of its future performance.

Furthermore, the enterprise business unit’s revenue and customer growth could slow or decline for a number of reasons, including slowing demand for its products, increased competition, changes to technology, a decrease in growth in the overall market, or our failure, for any reason, to continue to take advantage of growth opportunities. Moreover, we have encountered and will continue to encounter a number of risks and uncertainties frequently experienced by growing companies in the technology industry, such as the risks and uncertainties described in this prospectus. If our assumptions regarding these risks and uncertainties are incorrect or change due to changes in our market, or if we do not address these risks successfully, the enterprise business unit’s operating and financial results could differ materially from our expectations and this business unit could suffer.

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Our enterprise software business has relied on, and is expected to continue to rely on, orders from a relatively small number of customers for a substantial portion of our revenue, and the loss of any of these customers would significantly harm our operating and financial results

Our revenue is dependent on orders from customers in the P&C insurance industry, which may be adversely affected by economic, environmental, social, and geo-political conditions. We currently charge customers a license fee for our enterprise software that is proportional to the size of their business. This means we can expect to make more revenue from one large-sized customer (as measured by the size of the customer’s business) than from several small-sized customers (as measured by the size of their business). We currently rely on and expect to continue to rely on a relatively small number of large-sized customers to account for a majority of our revenue. As a result, if we fail to successfully sell our products and services to one or more of these large-sized customers in any particular period or fail to identify additional potential large-sized customers, or such customers purchase fewer of our products or services, defer or cancel purchase orders for any reason, fail to renew their license or subscription agreements or otherwise terminate their relationship with us for any reason, the results of operations and financial condition of the enterprise business unit would be significantly harmed.

Our Metromile Enterprise business may cost more to operate than anticipated.

Metromile Enterprise has historically generated more cash than operating expenses due to prepaid revenue and service fees associated with signed deployments. As customer deployments increase, customers request new features, and upgrades and investments are required, we may need to accelerate our spend meaningfully and this could adversely impact our operating income.

The market in which the enterprise software business operates is highly competitive, and if we do not compete effectively, our business, our financial condition, and results of operations could be harmed

The market in which our enterprise software business operates is rapidly evolving and highly competitive. As it continues to mature and evolve, existing competitors will continue to introduce new, innovative products, and new competitors will continue to enter, thereby further intensifying competition.

We face competition from a number of sources:

•        Large, well-established, P&C software providers that have been selling into the P&C industry for quite some time seeking to introduce new features or launch product(s) that mimic the functionality of some of our product(s);

•        Large, well-established, custom software development and professional services companies offering bespoke software that competes with some or all of our enterprise software products; and

•        New or emerging entrants seeking to develop competing technology products.

We compete based on a number of factors, including innovativeness of our products, demonstrable breadth of use cases, maturity of software, speed of deployment, total cost of ownership of our products, customer service and support, brand recognition of the core Metromile business and ease of implementation. Some of our competitors have substantially greater customer relationships, and financial, technical and other resources than we do, and may be able to respond more effectively than us to new opportunities, technologies and customer needs. As a result, competition may negatively impact our ability to attract new customers or retain existing ones, or put downward pressure on our prices, any of which could materially harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Our enterprise software products expose us to liability associated with customer contracts and the use of their customers data.

Metromile Enterprise is a cloud-based subscription software solution provided to global P&C insurers. Through the deployment of this service, insurers may share or provide Metromile with customer data or aggregated data that reveals personally identifying information about the insurers’ customers. This data exposes us to material liability if it is publicly disclosed, copied, or used in an inadvertent way that violates the terms of our contract with our enterprise business unit’s customers, or their terms of service with their customers, or state or national laws.

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We may become subject to intellectual property disputes or other claims of infringement, which are costly and may subject us to significant liability and increased costs of doing business.

We compete in a market where there are a large number of patents, copyrights, trademarks, trade secrets, and other intellectual and proprietary rights, as well as disputes regarding infringement of these rights. In particular, leading companies in the software industry own large numbers of patents, copyrights, trademarks and trade secrets, which they may use to assert claims against us. From time to time, third parties holding such intellectual property rights, including leading companies, competitors, patent holding companies and/or non-practicing entities, may assert patent, copyright, trademark or other intellectual property claims against us.

Although we believe that our products and services do not infringe upon the intellectual property rights of third parties, we cannot assure that third parties will not assert infringement or misappropriation claims against us with respect to current or future products or services, or that any such assertions will not require us to enter into royalty arrangements or result in costly litigation, or result in us being unable to use certain intellectual property. We cannot assure that we are not infringing or otherwise violating any third-party intellectual property rights.

Any intellectual property litigation to which we become a party may require us to do one or more of the following:

•        cease selling, licensing, or using products or features that incorporate the intellectual property rights that we allegedly infringe, misappropriate, or violate;

•        make substantial payments for legal fees, settlement payments, or other costs or damages, including indemnification of third parties;

•        obtain a license or enter into a royalty agreement, either of which may not be available on reasonable terms or at all, in order to obtain the right to sell or use the relevant intellectual property; or

•        redesign the allegedly infringing products to avoid infringement, misappropriation, or violation, which could be costly, time-consuming, or impossible.

Any of these events or any adverse result in any litigation claims against us could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

A significant portion of our future operating profit gains are expected to arise from the growth in our enterprise software revenue, which may not be realized.

Our Metromile Enterprise business is a new and growing business. While we have several new customer deployments active or underway, there is no guarantee that these deployments will materially increase revenue if customers cancel their contracts, reduce their desired level of services, or new customers do not sign up for the services. Any of which could significantly harm our business, operating results and financial condition.

Risks Related to Our Business Model and Industry

The insurance business, including the market for automobile, renters’ and homeowners’ insurance, is historically cyclical in nature, and we may experience periods with excess underwriting capacity and unfavorable premium rates, which could adversely affect our business.

Historically, insurers have experienced significant fluctuations in operating results due to competition, frequency and severity of catastrophic events, levels of capacity, adverse litigation trends, regulatory constraints, general economic conditions, and other factors. The supply of insurance is related to prevailing prices, the level of insured losses and the level of capital available to the industry that, in turn, may fluctuate in response to changes in rates of return on investments being earned in the insurance industry. As a result, the insurance business historically has been a cyclical industry characterized by periods of intense price competition due to excessive underwriting capacity as well as periods when shortages of capacity increased premium levels. Demand for insurance depends on numerous factors, including the frequency and severity of catastrophic events, levels of capacity, the introduction of new capital providers and general economic conditions. All of these factors fluctuate and may contribute to price declines generally in the insurance industry.

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We cannot predict with certainty whether market conditions will improve, remain constant or deteriorate. Negative market conditions may impair our ability to underwrite insurance at rates we consider appropriate and commensurate relative to the risk assumed. Additionally, negative market conditions could result in a decline in policies sold, an increase in the frequency of claims and premium defaults, and an uptick in the frequency of falsification of claims. If we cannot underwrite insurance at appropriate rates, our ability to transact business will be materially and adversely affected. Any of these factors could lead to an adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Reinsurance may be unavailable at current levels and prices, which may limit our ability to underwrite new policies. Furthermore, reinsurance subjects us to counterparty risk and may not be adequate to protect us against losses, which could have a material effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

Reinsurance is a contract by which an insurer, which may be referred to as the ceding insurer, agrees with a second insurer, called a reinsurer, that the reinsurer will cover a portion of the losses incurred by the ceding insurer in the event a claim is made under one or more policies issued by the ceding insurer, in exchange for a premium. Our regulated insurance subsidiary, Metromile Insurance Company, obtains reinsurance to help manage its exposure to property and casualty insurance risks. Although our reinsurance counterparties are liable to us according to the terms of the reinsurance policies, we remain primarily liable to our policyholders as the direct insurers on all risks reinsured. As a result, reinsurance does not eliminate the obligation of our regulated insurance subsidiary to pay all claims, and we are subject to the risk that one or more of our reinsurers will be unable or unwilling to honor its obligations, that the reinsurers will not pay in a timely fashion, or that our losses are so large that they exceed the limits inherent in our reinsurance contracts, limiting recovery. We are also subject to the risk that under applicable insurance laws and regulations we may not be able to take credit for the reinsurance on our financial statements and instead would be required to hold separate admitted assets as reserves to cover claims on the risks that we have ceded to the reinsurer. Reinsurers may become financially unsound by the time they are called upon to pay amounts due, which may not occur for many years, in which case we may have no legal ability to recover what is due to us under our agreement with such reinsurer. Any disputes with reinsurers regarding coverage under reinsurance contracts could be time consuming, costly, and uncertain of success.

Market conditions beyond our control impact the availability and cost of the reinsurance we purchase. No assurances can be made that reinsurance will remain continuously available to us to the same extent and on the same terms and rates as is currently available, as such availability depends in part on factors outside of our control. A new contract may not provide sufficient reinsurance protection. Market forces and external factors, such as significant losses from weather and seismic events (like hurricanes or earthquakes) or terrorist attacks or an increase in capital and surplus requirements, impact the availability and cost of the reinsurance we purchase. If we were unable to maintain our current level of reinsurance or purchase new reinsurance protection in amounts that we consider sufficient at acceptable prices, we would have to either accept an increase in our catastrophe exposure, reduce our insurance underwritings, or develop or seek other alternatives.

The unavailability of acceptable reinsurance protection would have a materially adverse impact on our business model, which depends on reinsurance companies to absorb any unfavorable variance from the level of losses anticipated at underwriting. If we are unable to obtain adequate reinsurance at reasonable rates, we would have to increase our risk exposure or reduce the level of our underwriting commitments, each of which could have a material adverse effect upon our business volume and profitability. Alternatively, we could elect to pay higher than anticipated rates for reinsurance coverage, which could have a material adverse effect upon our profitability unless policy premium rates could also be raised, in most cases subject to approval by state regulators, to offset this additional cost.

Reinsurance subjects us to risks of our reinsurers and may not be adequate to protect us against losses arising from ceded insurance, which could have a material effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

The collectability of reinsurance recoverables is subject to uncertainty arising from a number of factors, including changes in market conditions, whether insured losses meet the qualifying conditions of the reinsurance contract and whether reinsurers, their affiliates, or certain regulatory bodies have the financial capacity and willingness to make payments under the terms of a reinsurance treaty or contract. Any disruption, volatility and uncertainty in the financial reinsurance markets may decrease our ability to access such markets on favorable terms or at all. In addition, we are subject to the risk that one or more of our reinsurers will not honor its obligations, that

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the reinsurers will not pay in a timely fashion, or that our losses are so large that they exceed the limits inherent in our reinsurance contracts, limiting recovery. Reinsurers may become financially unsound by the time that they are called upon to pay amounts due, which may not occur for many years, in which case we may have no legal ability to recover what is due to us under our agreement with such reinsurer. In addition, any disputes with reinsurers regarding coverage under reinsurance contracts could be time consuming, costly, and uncertain of success. Our inability to collect a material recovery from a reinsurer could have a material effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

We are subject to extensive regulation and potential further restrictive regulation may increase our operating costs and limit our growth.

We are subject to extensive laws by the individual state insurance departments in the states in which we transact business. These laws are complex and subject to change. Changes may sometimes lead to additional expenses, increased legal exposure, increased required reserves or capital and surplus, delays in implementing desired rate increases or business operations, and additional limits on our ability to grow or to achieve targeted profitability. Laws to which our licensed insurance carriers and producer subsidiaries are subject include, but are not limited to:

•        prior approval of transactions resulting in a change of control;

•        approval of policy forms and premiums;

•        approval of intercompany service agreements;

•        statutory and risk-based capital solvency requirements, including the minimum capital and surplus our regulated insurance subsidiary must maintain pursuant to applicable laws and the CMA entered into as required by the Delaware Department of Insurance described above;

•        establishing minimum reserves that insurance carriers must hold to pay projected insurance claims;

•        required participation by our regulated insurance subsidiary in state guaranty funds;

•        restrictions on the type and concentration of our regulated insurance subsidiary’s investments;

•        restrictions on the advertising and marketing of insurance;

•        restrictions on the adjustment and settlement of insurance claims;

•        restrictions on the use of rebates to induce a policyholder to purchase insurance;

•        restrictions on the sale, solicitation and negotiation of insurance;

•        restrictions on the sharing of insurance commissions and payment of referral fees;

•        prohibitions on the underwriting of insurance on the basis of race, sex, religion and other protected classes;

•        restrictions on our ability to use telematics to underwrite and price insurance policies, such as in California, our largest market, and other states in which we operate or may operate in the future;

•        restrictions on the ability of our regulated insurance subsidiary to pay dividends to us or enter into certain related party transactions without prior regulatory approval;

•        rules requiring the maintenance of statutory deposits for the benefit of policyholders;

•        privacy regulation and data security;

•        state-mandated premium rebates, refunds, or reductions as a result of potentially lower risk exposure due to the COVID-19 pandemic and related emergency orders;

•        regulation of corporate governance and risk management; and

•        periodic examinations of operations, finances, market conduct and claims practices; and required periodic financial reporting.

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To the extent we decide to expand our current product offerings to include other insurance products, this would subject us to additional regulatory requirements and scrutiny in each state in which we elect to offer such products. Most states have also adopted legislation prohibiting unfair methods of competition and unfair or deceptive acts and practices in the business of insurance as well as unfair claims practices. Prohibited practices include, but are not limited to, misrepresentations, false advertising, coercion, disparaging other insurers, unfair claims settlement procedures, and discrimination in the business of insurance. Noncompliance with any of such state statutes may subject us to regulatory action by the relevant state insurance regulator, and possibly private litigation. States also regulate various aspects of the contractual relationships between insurers and independent agents as well as, in certain states, insurers and third-party administrators.

Although state insurance regulators have primary responsibility for administering and enforcing insurance regulations in the U.S., such laws and regulations are further administered and enforced by a number of additional governmental authorities, each of which exercises a degree of interpretive latitude, including state securities administrators; state attorneys general as well as federal agencies including the SEC, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, the Federal Reserve Board, the Federal Insurance Office, the U.S. Department of Labor, the U.S. Department of Justice and the National Labor Relations Board. Consequently, compliance with any particular regulator’s or enforcement authority’s interpretation of a legal issue may not result in compliance with another’s interpretation of the same issue, particularly when compliance is judged in hindsight. Such regulations or enforcement actions are often responsive to current consumer and political sensitivities, which may arise after a major event. Such rules and regulations may result in rate suppression, limit our ability to manage our exposure to unprofitable or volatile risks, or lead to fines, premium refunds or other adverse consequences. The federal government also may regulate aspects of our businesses, such as the protection of consumer confidential information or the use of consumer insurance (credit) scores to underwrite and assess the risk of customers under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, or FCRA. Among other things, the FCRA requires that insurance companies (i) have a permissible purpose before obtaining and using a consumer report for underwriting purposes and (ii) comply with related notice and recordkeeping requirements. Failure to comply with federal requirements under the FCRA or any other applicable federal laws could subject us to regulatory fines and other sanctions. In addition, given our short operating history to-date and rapid rate of growth, we are vulnerable to regulators identifying errors in the policy forms we use, the rates we charge, with respect to our customer communications. As a result of such noncompliance, regulators could impose fines, rebates or other penalties, including cease-and-desist orders with respect to our operations in an individual state, or all states, until the identified noncompliance is rectified.

In addition, there is risk that any particular regulator’s or enforcement authority’s interpretation of a legal issue or the scope of a regulator’s authority may change over time to our detriment. There is also a risk that changes in the overall legal environment may cause us to change our views regarding the actions we need to take from a legal risk management perspective. This would necessitate changes to our practices that may adversely impact our business. Furthermore, in some cases, these laws and regulations are designed to protect or benefit the interests of a specific constituency rather than a range of constituencies. State insurance laws and regulations are generally intended to protect the interests of purchasers or users of insurance products, rather than the holders of securities that we issue. For example, state insurance laws are generally prescriptive with respect to the content and timeliness of notices we must provide policyholders. We recently became aware that we likely failed to comply with certain notice period timeliness requirements when cancelling a number of policies for nonpayment, as a result of which we could be liable for claims made under those policies. We are currently working to determine the exact extent to which cancellations were affected, and currently cannot predict with any certainty what impact, if any, these non-cancellations may have on our business, results of operations and financial condition, although this impact could be material. Failure to comply with other state insurance laws and regulations in the future could also have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results and financial condition.

Additionally, the federal government could pass a law expanding its authority to regulate the insurance industry, expanding federal regulation over our business to our detriment. These laws and regulations may limit our ability to grow, to raise additional capital or to improve the profitability of our business.

Our ability to retain state licenses depends on our ability to meet licensing requirements established by the NAIC and adopted by each state, subject to variations across states. If we are unable to satisfy the applicable licensing requirements of any particular state, we could lose our license to do business in that state, which would result in the temporary or permanent cessation of our operations in that state. Alternatively, if we are unable to

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satisfy applicable state licensing requirements, we may be subject to additional regulatory oversight, have our license suspended, or be subject to the seizure of assets. Any such events could adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition.

A regulatory environment that requires rate increases to be approved and that can dictate underwriting practices and mandate participation in loss sharing arrangements may adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

From time to time, political events and positions affect the insurance market, including efforts to suppress rates to a level that may not allow us to reach targeted levels of profitability. For example, if our loss ratio compares favorably to that of the industry, state or provincial regulatory authorities may impose rate rollbacks, require us to pay premium refunds to policyholders, or challenge or otherwise delay our efforts to raise rates even if the property and casualty industry generally is not experiencing regulatory challenges to rate increases. Such challenges affect our ability to obtain approval for rate changes that may be required to achieve targeted levels of profitability and returns on equity. In particular due to the COVID-19 pandemic, state regulators and legislators are under increased political pressure to provide financial relief to policyholders through premium rebates or requiring insurers to pay claims arising from COVID-19 related losses, regardless of the applicable policy’s exclusions.

In addition, certain states have enacted laws that require an insurer conducting business in that state to participate in assigned risk plans, reinsurance facilities and joint underwriting associations. Certain states also require insurers to offer coverage to all consumers, often restricting an insurer’s ability to charge the price it might otherwise charge. In these markets, we may be compelled to underwrite significant amounts of business at lower-than-desired rates, possibly leading to an unacceptable return on equity. Laws and regulations of many states also limit an insurer’s ability to discontinue writing some or all of its business or to withdraw from one or more lines of insurance, except pursuant to a plan that is approved by the state insurance department. Additionally, as addressed above, certain states require insurers to participate in guaranty funds for impaired or insolvent insurance companies. These funds periodically assess losses against all insurance companies doing business in the state. Our results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected by any of these factors.

State insurance regulators impose additional reporting requirements regarding enterprise risk on insurance holding company systems, with which we must comply as an insurance holding company.

In the past decade, various state insurance regulators have increased their focus on risks within an insurer’s holding company system that may pose enterprise risk to the insurer. In 2012, the NAIC adopted significant amendments to the Insurance Holding Company Act and related regulations (the “NAIC Amendments”). The NAIC Amendments are designed to respond to perceived gaps in the regulation of insurance holding company systems in the United States. One of the major changes is a requirement that an insurance holding company system’s ultimate controlling person submit annually to its lead state insurance regulator an “enterprise risk report” that identifies activities, circumstances or events involving one or more affiliates of an insurer that, if not remedied properly, are likely to have a material adverse effect upon the financial condition or liquidity of the insurer or its insurance holding company system as a whole. As the ultimate controlling person in the insurance holding company system, we are required to file an annual enterprise risk report in one or more states. Other changes include the requirement that a controlling person submit prior notice to its domiciliary insurance regulator of a divestiture of control, having detailed minimum requirements for cost sharing and management agreements between an insurer and its affiliates and expanding of the agreements between an insurer and its affiliates to be filed with its domiciliary insurance regulator, including states in which the insurer is commercially domiciled. The NAIC Amendments must be adopted by the individual state legislatures and insurance regulators in order to be effective, and many states have already done so.

In 2012, the NAIC also adopted the Risk Management and Own Risk and Solvency Assessment Model Act (the “ORSA Model Act”). The ORSA Model Act, as adopted by the various states, requires an insurance holding company system’s Chief Risk Officer to submit annually to its lead state insurance regulator an Own Risk and Solvency Assessment Summary Report, or ORSA. The ORSA is a confidential internal assessment appropriate to the nature, scale and complexity of an insurer, conducted by that insurer of the material and relevant risks identified by the insurer associated with an insurer’s current business plan and the sufficiency of capital resources to support those risks. The ORSA Model Act must be adopted by the individual state legislature and insurance regulators in order to be effective. We cannot predict the impact, if any, that any other regulatory requirements may have on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

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There is also risk that insurance holding company systems may become subject to group capital requirements at the holding company level. The NAIC is currently working to develop a group capital calculation framework that regulators may use for informational purposes. As envisioned, the framework is intended to complement the current holding company analytics framework by providing additional information to the lead state regulator for use in assessing group risks and capital adequacy. The NAIC has not promulgated a model law or regulation on this subject.

The increasing adoption by states of cybersecurity regulations could impose additional compliance burdens on us and expose us to additional liability.

In response to the growing threat of cyber-attacks in the insurance industry, certain jurisdictions have begun to consider new cybersecurity measures, including the adoption of cybersecurity regulations. On October 24, 2017, the NAIC adopted its Insurance Data Security Model Law (the “Insurance Data Security Model Law”), intended to serve as model legislation for states to enact in order to govern cybersecurity and data protection practices of insurers, insurance agents, and other licensed entities registered under state insurance laws. Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, New Hampshire, Ohio, South Carolina and Virginia have adopted versions of the Insurance Data Security Model Law, each with a different effective date, and other states may adopt versions of the Insurance Data Security Model Law in the future. The New York Department of Financial Services has promulgated its own Cybersecurity Requirements for Financial Services Companies that is not based upon the Insurance Data Security Model Law and requires insurance companies to establish and maintain a cybersecurity program and implement and maintain cybersecurity policies and procedures with specific requirements. In addition, some jurisdictions, such as California, Massachusetts, and Nevada have enacted more generalized data security laws that apply to certain data that we process. Although we take steps to comply with financial industry cybersecurity regulations and other data security laws and believe we are materially compliant with their requirements, our failure to comply with new or existing cybersecurity regulations could result in material regulatory actions and other penalties. In addition, efforts to comply with new or existing cybersecurity regulations could impose significant costs on our business, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations.

We rely on technology and intellectual property from third parties for pricing and underwriting our insurance policies, handling claims and maximizing automation, the unavailability or inaccuracy of which could limit the functionality of our products and disrupt our business.

We use technology and intellectual property licensed from unaffiliated third parties in certain of our products, and we may license additional third-party technology and intellectual property in the future. Any errors or defects in this third-party technology and intellectual property could result in harm to our brand and business. In addition, licensed technology and intellectual property may not continue to be available on commercially reasonable terms, or at all.

Further, although we believe that there are currently adequate replacements for the third-party technology and intellectual property we presently use, the loss of our right to use any of this technology and intellectual property could result in delays in producing or delivering affected products until equivalent technology or intellectual property is identified, licensed or otherwise procured, and integrated. Our business would be disrupted if any technology and intellectual property we license from others or functional equivalents of this software were either no longer available to us or no longer offered to us on commercially reasonable terms or prices. In either case, we would be required either to attempt to redesign our products to function with technology and intellectual property available from other parties or to develop these components ourselves, which would result in increased costs and could result in delays in product sales and the release of new product offerings. Alternatively, we might be forced to limit the features available in affected products. Any of these results could harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We are subject to payment processing risk.

We currently rely exclusively on one third-party vendor to provide payment processing services, including the processing of payments from credit cards and debit cards, and our business would be disrupted if this vendor refuses to provide these services to us and we are unable to find a suitable replacement on a timely basis or at all. If we or our processing vendor fail to maintain adequate systems for the authorization and processing of credit

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card transactions, it could cause one or more of the major credit card companies to disallow our continued use of their payment products. In addition, if these systems fail to work properly and, as a result, we do not charge our customers’ credit cards on a timely basis or at all, our business, revenue, results of operations and financial condition could be harmed.

The payment methods that we offer also subject us to potential fraud and theft by criminals, who are becoming increasingly more sophisticated, seeking to obtain unauthorized access to or exploit weaknesses that may exist in the payment systems. If we fail to comply with applicable rules or requirements for the payment methods we accept, or if payment-related data are compromised due to a breach of data, we may be liable for significant costs incurred by payment card issuing banks and other third parties or subject to fines and higher transaction fees, or our ability to accept or facilitate certain types of payments may be impaired. In addition, our customers could lose confidence in certain payment types, which may result in a shift to other payment types or potential changes to our payment systems that may result in higher costs. If we fail to adequately control fraudulent credit card transactions, we may face civil liability, diminished public perception of our security measures, and significantly higher credit card-related costs, each of which could harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Our success depends upon the insurance industry continuing to move online at its current pace and the continued growth and acceptance of online and mobile app-based products and services as effective alternatives to traditional offline products and services.

We provide automobile insurance products through our website and our online and mobile apps that compete with traditional offline counterparts. We do not offer insurance through traditional, offline brokers or agents. We believe that the continued growth and acceptance of online products and services as well as those offered through mobile devices generally will depend, to a large extent, on the continued growth in commercial use of the internet and mobile apps, and the continued migration of traditional offline markets and industries online.

Purchasers of insurance may develop the perception that purchasing insurance products online or through a mobile app is not as effective as purchasing such products through a broker or other traditional offline methods, and the insurance market may not migrate online as quickly as (or at the levels that) we expect. Moreover, if, for any reason, an unfavorable perception develops that telematics, mobile engagement, a technology-based platform and/or bots are less efficacious than traditional offline methods of purchasing insurance, underwriting, and claims processing, or if it is perceived that our processes lead to unfair outcomes, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected.

Our actual incurred losses may be greater than our loss and loss adjustment expense reserves, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Our financial condition and results of operations depend on our ability to accurately price risk and assess potential losses and loss adjustment expenses under the terms of the policies we underwrite. Reserves do not represent an exact calculation of liability. Rather, reserves represent an estimate of what the expected ultimate settlement and administration of claims will cost, and the ultimate liability may be greater than or less than the current estimate. In our industry, there is always the risk that reserves may prove inadequate since we may underestimate the cost of claims and claims administration.

We base our estimates on our assessment of known facts and circumstances, as well as estimates of future trends in claim severity, claim frequency, judicial theories of liability, and other factors. These variables are affected by both internal and external events that could increase our exposure to losses, including changes in actuarial projections, claims handling procedures, inflation, severe weather, climate change, economic and judicial trends and legislative and regulatory changes. We regularly monitor reserves using new information on reported claims and a variety of statistical techniques to update our current estimate. Our estimates could prove to be inadequate, and this underestimation could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition.

Recorded claim reserves, including case reserves and incurred but not reported, or IBNR, claims reserves, are based on our estimates of losses after considering known facts and interpretations of the circumstances, including settlement agreements. Additionally, models that rely on the assumption that past loss development patterns will persist into the future are used. Internal factors are considered including our experience with similar cases, actual claims paid, historical trends involving claim payment patterns, pending levels of unpaid claims, loss management programs, product mix, state mix, contractual terms, industry payment and reporting patterns, and changes in claim

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reporting and settlement practices. External factors are also considered, such as court decisions, changes in law and litigation imposing unintended coverage. We also consider benefits, such as the availability of multiple limits for a single loss occurrence. Regulatory requirements and economic conditions are also considered.

Because reserves are estimates of the unpaid portion of losses and expenses for events that have occurred, including IBNR losses, the establishment of appropriate reserves, including reserves for catastrophes, is an inherently uncertain and complex process that is regularly refined to reflect current estimation processes and practices. The ultimate cost of losses may vary materially from recorded reserves and such variance may adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition as the reserves and reinsurance recoverables are re-estimated.

If any of our insurance reserves should prove to be inadequate for the reasons discussed above, or for any other reason, we will be required to increase reserves, resulting in a reduction in our net income and stockholders’ equity in the period in which the deficiency is identified. Future loss experience substantially in excess of established reserves could also have a material adverse effect on future earnings and liquidity and financial rating, which would affect our ability to attract new business or to retain existing customers.

Performance of our investment portfolio is subject to a variety of investment risks that may adversely affect our financial results.

Our results of operations depend, in part, on the performance of our investment portfolio. We seek to hold a diversified portfolio of investments in accordance with our investment policy, which is routinely reviewed by the Investment Committee of our Board of Directors. However, our investments are subject to general economic and market risks as well as risks inherent to particular securities.

Our primary market risk exposures are to changes in interest rates. See the section titled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations — Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk.” In recent years, interest rates have been at or near historic lows. A protracted low interest rate environment would continue to place pressure on our net investment income, particularly as it relates to fixed income securities and short-term investments, which, in turn, may adversely affect our operating results. Future increases in interest rates could cause the values of our fixed income securities portfolios to decline, with the magnitude of the decline depending on the maturity of the securities included in our portfolio and the amount by which interest rates increase. Some fixed income securities have call or prepayment options, which create possible reinvestment risk in declining rate environments. Other fixed income securities, such as asset-backed securities, carry prepayment risk or, in a rising interest rate environment, may not prepay as quickly as expected.

The value of our investment portfolio is subject to the risk that certain investments may default or become impaired due to deterioration in the financial condition of one or more issuers of the securities we hold, or due to deterioration in the financial condition of an insurer that guarantees an issuer’s payments on such investments. Downgrades in the credit ratings of fixed maturities also have a significant negative effect on the market valuation of such securities.

Such factors could reduce our net investment income and result in realized investment losses. Our investment portfolio is subject to increased valuation uncertainties when investment markets are illiquid. The valuation of investments is more subjective when markets are illiquid, thereby increasing the risk that the estimated fair value (i.e., the carrying amount) of the securities we hold in our portfolio does not reflect prices at which actual transactions would occur.

Risks for all types of securities are managed through the application of our investment policy, which establishes investment parameters that include, but are not limited to, maximum percentages of investment in certain types of securities and minimum levels of credit quality, which we believe are within applicable guidelines established by the NAIC as it relates to the portfolio of Metromile Insurance Company. The maximum percentage and types of securities we may invest in are subject to the insurance laws regulations, which may change. Failure to comply with these laws and regulations would cause non-conforming investments to be treated as non-admitted assets for purposes of measuring statutory surplus and, in certain circumstances, we would be required to dispose of such investments.

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Although we seek to preserve our capital, we cannot be certain that our investment objectives will be achieved, and results may vary substantially over time. In addition, although we seek to employ investment strategies that are not correlated with our insurance and reinsurance exposures, losses in our investment portfolio may occur at the same time as underwriting losses and, therefore, exacerbate the adverse effect of the losses on us.

Unexpected changes in the interpretation of our coverage or provisions, including loss limitations and exclusions, in our policies could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

There can be no assurances that specifically negotiated loss limitations or exclusions in our policies will be enforceable in the manner we intend, or at all. As industry practices and legal, judicial, social, and other conditions change, unexpected and unintended issues related to claims and coverage may emerge. For example, many of our policies limit the period during which a customer may bring a claim, which may be shorter than the statutory period under which such claims can be brought against our customers. While these limitations and exclusions help us assess and mitigate our loss exposure, it is possible that a court or regulatory authority could nullify or void a limitation or exclusion, or legislation could be enacted modifying or barring the use of such limitations or exclusions. These types of governmental actions could result in higher than anticipated losses and loss adjustment expenses, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations. In addition, court decisions, such as the 1995 Montrose decision in California, could read policy exclusions narrowly so as to expand coverage, thereby requiring insurers to create and write new exclusions. Under the insurance laws, the insurer typically has the burden of proving an exclusion applies and any ambiguities in the terms of a loss limitation or exclusion provision are typically construed against the insurer. These issues may adversely affect our business by either broadening coverage beyond our underwriting intent or by increasing the frequency or severity of claims. In some instances, these changes may not become apparent until sometime after we have issued insurance contracts that are affected by the changes. As a result, the full extent of liability under our insurance contracts may not be known for many years after a contract is issued.

Risks Related to Ownership of Our Securities

Concentration of ownership among our existing executive officers, directors and their respective affiliates may prevent new investors from influencing significant corporate decisions.

At the Closing, our affiliates, executive officers, directors and their respective affiliates as a group beneficially owned approximately 15% of the outstanding Common Stock. As a result, these stockholders are able to exercise a significant level of control over all matters requiring stockholder approval, including the election of directors, amendment of our Certificate of Incorporation and approval of significant corporate transactions. This control could have the effect of delaying or preventing a change of control of us or changes in management and will make the approval of certain transactions difficult or impossible without the support of these stockholders.

We do not expect to declare any dividends in the foreseeable future.

We do not anticipate declaring any cash dividends to holders of Common Stock in the foreseeable future. Consequently, investors may need to rely on sales of their shares after price appreciation, which may never occur, as the only way to realize any future gains on their investment.

Provisions in our charter and Delaware law may inhibit a takeover of us, which could limit the price investors might be willing to pay in the future for our Common Stock and could entrench management.

Our Certificate of Incorporation contains provisions that may discourage unsolicited takeover proposals that stockholders may consider to be in their best interests. These provisions include the ability of our board of directors to designate the terms of and issue new series of preferred shares, which may make more difficult the removal of management and may discourage transactions that otherwise could involve payment of a premium over prevailing market prices for our securities. These anti-takeover defenses could discourage, delay or prevent a transaction involving a change in control of the Company. These provisions could also discourage proxy contests and make it more difficult for you and other stockholders to elect directors of your choosing and cause us to take corporate actions other than those you desire.

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A market for our securities may not continue, which would adversely affect the liquidity and price of our securities.

The price of our securities may fluctuate significantly due to general market and economic conditions. An active trading market for our securities may not be sustained.

We will incur significant costs and obligations as a result of being a public company.

As a privately held company, Legacy Metromile was not required to comply with many corporate governance and financial reporting practices and policies required of a publicly traded company. As a publicly traded company, we will incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses that we were not required to incur in the past. These expenses will increase once we are no longer an “emerging growth company” as defined under the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 (the “JOBS Act”). In addition, new and changing laws, regulations and standards relating to corporate governance and public disclosure for public companies, including Dodd Frank, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, regulations related thereto and the rules and regulations of the SEC and Nasdaq, have increased the costs and the time that must be devoted to compliance matters. We expect these rules and regulations will increase our legal and financial costs and lead to a diversion of management time and attention from revenue-generating activities.

For as long as we remain an “emerging growth company” as defined in the JOBS Act, we may take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not “emerging growth companies.” We may remain an “emerging growth company until September 8, 2025 or such earlier time that we have more than $1.07 billion in annual revenues, have more than $700.0 million in market value of our Common Stock held by non-affiliates, or issue more than $1.0 billion of non-convertible debt over a three-year period. To the extent we choose not to use exemptions from various reporting requirements under the JOBS Act, or if we no longer can be classified as an “emerging growth company,” we expect that we will incur additional compliance costs, which will reduce our ability to operate profitably.

As an “emerging growth company,” we cannot be certain if the reduced disclosure requirements applicable to “emerging growth companies” will make our Common Stock less attractive to investors.

As an “emerging growth company,” we may take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not “emerging growth companies,” including not being required to obtain an assessment of the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting from our independent registered public accounting firm pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements, and exemptions from the requirements of holding a non-binding advisory vote on executive compensation and stockholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. In addition, the JOBS Act provides that an emerging growth company can take advantage of an extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards, which we have elected to do.

We cannot predict if investors will find our Common Stock less attractive because we will rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our Common Stock less attractive as a result, there may be a less active market for our Common Stock, our share price may be more volatile and the price at which our securities trade could be less than if we did not use these exemptions.

If we do not develop and implement all required accounting practices and policies, we may be unable to provide the financial information required of a U.S. publicly traded company in a timely and reliable manner.

As Legacy Metromile was a privately held company, it was not required to adopt all of the financial reporting and disclosure procedures and controls required of a U.S. publicly traded company. We expect that the implementation of all required accounting practices and policies and the hiring of additional financial staff will increase our operating costs of and require our management to devote significant time and resources to such implementation. If we fail to develop and maintain effective internal controls and procedures and disclosure procedures and controls, we may be unable to provide financial information and required SEC reports that are timely and reliable. Any such delays or deficiencies could harm us, including by limiting our ability to obtain financing, either in the public capital markets or from private sources and damaging our reputation, which in either cause could impede our ability to implement our growth strategy. In addition, any such delays or deficiencies could result in our failure to meet the requirements for continued listing of our Common Stock on Nasdaq.

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We may issue additional shares of common stock or other equity securities without your approval, which would dilute your ownership interest in us and may depress the market price of our Common Stock.

We may issue additional shares of common stock or other equity securities in the future in connection with, among other things, future acquisitions, repayment of outstanding indebtedness or grants under our 2021 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2021 Plan”) without stockholder approval in a number of circumstances.

Our issuance of additional common stock or other equity securities could have one or more of the following effects:

•        our existing stockholders’ proportionate ownership interest in us will decrease;

•        the amount of cash available per share, including for payment of dividends in the future, may decrease;

•        the relative voting strength of each previously outstanding share of common stock may be diminished; and

•        the market price of our Common Stock may decline.

If our performance does not meet market expectations, the price of our securities may decline.

If our performance does not meet market expectations, the price of our Common Stock may decline from the price of our Common Stock prior to the Closing. The trading price of our Common Stock could be volatile and subject to wide fluctuations in response to various factors, some of which are beyond our control. Any of the factors listed below could have a material adverse effect on your investment in our Common Stock and our Common Stock may trade at prices significantly below the price you paid for them.

Factors affecting the trading price of our Common Stock may include:

•        actual or anticipated fluctuations in our quarterly financial results or the quarterly financial results of companies perceived to be similar to us;

•        changes in the market’s expectations about our operating results;

•        our operating results failing to meet market expectations in a particular period;

•        changes in financial estimates and recommendations by securities analysts concerning us or the insurance industry and market in general;

•        operating and stock price performance of other companies that investors deem comparable to us;

•        changes in laws and regulations affecting our business;

•        changes in the interpretation or enforcement of statutes and regulations affecting our business;

•        commencement of, or involvement in, litigation involving us;

•        changes in our capital structure, such as future issuances of securities or the incurrence of additional debt;

•        the volume of shares of our Common Stock available for public sale;

•        any significant change in our board or management;

•        sales of substantial amounts of Common Stock by our directors, executive officers or significant stockholders or the perception that such sales could occur; and

•        general economic and political conditions such as recessions, interest rates, fuel prices, international currency fluctuations and acts of war or terrorism.

Broad market and industry factors may depress the market price of our Common Stock irrespective of our operating performance. The stock market in general and Nasdaq have experienced price and volume fluctuations that have often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of the particular companies affected.

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The trading prices and valuations of these stocks, and of our securities, may not be predictable. A loss of investor confidence in the market for companies in the insurance industry or the stocks of other companies which investors perceive to be similar to us could depress our stock price regardless of our business, prospects, financial conditions or results of operations. A decline in the market price of our Common Stock also could adversely affect our ability to issue additional securities and our ability to obtain additional financing in the future.

There is no guarantee that the Public Warrants may never be in the money, and they may expire worthless.

The exercise price for our Warrants is $11.50 per share. There can be no assurance that the Public Warrants will be in the money prior to their expiration and, as such, they may expire worthless.

The terms of our Warrants may be amended in a manner that may be adverse to the holders. The Warrant Agreement between Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company, as warrant agent, and us provides that the terms of the Warrants may be amended without the consent of any holder to cure any ambiguity or correct any defective provision, but requires the approval by the holders of at least 65% of the then outstanding Public Warrants to make any change that adversely affects the interests of the registered holders. Accordingly, we may amend the terms of the Warrants in a manner adverse to a holder if holders of at least 65% of the then outstanding Public Warrants approve of such amendment. Our ability to amend the terms of the Warrants with the consent of at least 65% of the then outstanding Public Warrants is unlimited. Examples of such amendments could be amendments to, among other things, increase the exercise price of the Warrants, shorten the exercise period or decrease the number of shares of our Common Stock purchasable upon exercise of a Warrant.

We may redeem your unexpired Warrants prior to their exercise at a time that is disadvantageous to you, thereby making your Warrants worthless.

We have the ability to redeem outstanding Warrants (excluding any Placement Warrants held by the Sponsor, Cantor Fitzgerald & Co. (“Cantor”) or their permitted transferees) at any time after they become exercisable and prior to their expiration, at $0.01 per Warrant, provided that the last reported sales price (or the closing bid price of our Common Stock in the event the shares of our Common Stock are not traded on any specific trading day) of the Common Stock equals or exceeds $18.00 per share (as adjusted for stock splits, stock dividends, reorganizations and the like) on each of 20 trading days within the 30 trading-day period ending on the third business day prior to the date on which we send proper notice of such redemption, provided that on the date we give notice of redemption and during the entire period thereafter until the time we redeem the Warrants, we have an effective registration statement under the Securities Act covering the shares of Common Stock issuable upon exercise of the Warrants and a current prospectus relating to them is available. If and when the Warrants become redeemable by us, we may exercise our redemption right even if we are unable to register or qualify the underlying securities for sale under all applicable state securities laws. Redemption of the outstanding Warrants could force a Warrant holder: (i) to exercise its Warrants and pay the exercise price therefore at a time when it may be disadvantageous for it to do so, (ii) to sell its Warrants at the then-current market price when it might otherwise wish to hold its Warrants or (iii) to accept the nominal redemption price which, at the time the outstanding Warrants are called for redemption, will be substantially less than the market value of its Warrants.

We may not be able to timely and effectively implement controls and procedures required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Commencing with our annual report for the year ending December 31, 2021, we will be required to provide management’s attestation on internal controls. The standards required for a public company under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act are significantly more stringent than those required of Legacy Metromile as a privately-held company. Management may not be able to effectively and timely implement controls and procedures that adequately respond to the increased regulatory compliance and reporting requirements that are applicable to us. If we are not able to implement the additional requirements of Section 404 in a timely manner or with adequate compliance, we may not be able to assess whether our internal controls over financial reporting are effective, which may subject us to adverse regulatory consequences and could harm investor confidence and lead to a decrease in the market price of our Common Stock.

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Pursuant to the JOBS Act, our independent registered public accounting firm will not be required to attest to the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act for so long as we are an “emerging growth company.”

Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires annual management assessments of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting, and generally requires in the same report a report by our independent registered public accounting firm on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. However, under the JOBS Act, our independent registered public accounting firm will not be required to attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act until we are no longer an “emerging growth company.” We will be an “emerging growth company” until the earlier of (1) the last day of the fiscal year (a) following September 8, 2025, the fifth anniversary of INSU’s IPO, (b) in which we have total annual gross revenue of at least $1.07 billion or (c) in which we are deemed to be a large accelerated filer, which means the market value of our Common Stock that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700.0 million as of the last business day of our prior second fiscal quarter, and (2) the date on which we have issued more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt during the prior three-year period. Accordingly, until we cease being an “emerging growth company” stockholders will not have the benefit of an independent assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control environment.

Our ability to meet expectations and projections in any research or reports published by securities or industry analysts, or a lack of coverage by securities or industry analysts, could result in a depressed market price and limited liquidity for our Common Stock.

The trading market for our Common Stock is influenced by the research and reports that industry or securities analysts may publish about us, our business, our market, or our competitors. If no securities or industry analysts commence coverage of us, our stock price would likely be less than that which would obtain if we had such coverage and the liquidity, or trading volume of our Common Stock may be limited, making it more difficult for a stockholder to sell shares at an acceptable price or amount. If any analysts do cover us, their projections may vary widely and may not accurately predict the results we actually achieve. Our share price may decline if our actual results do not match the projections of research analysts covering us. Similarly, if one or more of the analysts who write reports on us downgrades our stock or publishes inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our share price could decline. If one or more of these analysts ceases coverage of us or fails to publish reports on us regularly, our share price or trading volume could decline.

A significant portion of our total outstanding shares of our Common Stock are restricted from immediate resale but may be sold into the market in the near future. This could cause the market price of our Common Stock to drop significantly, even if our business is doing well.

Sales of a substantial number of shares of our Common Stock in the public market could occur at any time. These sales, or the perception in the market that the holders of a large number of shares intend to sell shares, could reduce the market price of our Common Stock. We are unable to predict the effect that sales may have on the prevailing market price of our Common Stock and Public Warrants.

To the extent our Warrants are exercised, additional shares of our Common Stock will be issued, which will result in dilution to the holders of our Common Stock and increase the number of shares eligible for resale in the public market. Sales, or the potential sales, of substantial numbers of shares in the public market by the Selling Securityholders, subject to certain restrictions on transfer until the termination of applicable lock-up periods, could increase the volatility of the market price of our Common Stock or adversely affect the market price of our Common Stock.

Furthermore, under the Amended and Restated Registration Rights Agreement (the “A&R Registration Rights Agreement”) and the Subscription Agreements, we are required to file a registration statement within 15 days after the Closing to register the resale of any shares of Common Stock issued to (a) the Subscribers pursuant to the Subscription Agreements and (b) certain of the stockholder parties to the A&R Registration Rights Agreement. See the section titled “Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions” for a discussion of the A&R Registration Rights Agreement and the Subscription Agreements.

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We may be subject to securities litigation, which is expensive and could divert management attention.

Our share price may be volatile and, in the past, companies that have experienced volatility in the market price of their stock have been subject to securities class action litigation. We may be the target of this type of litigation in the future. Litigation of this type could result in substantial costs and diversion of management’s attention and resources, which could have a material adverse effect on business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. Any adverse determination in litigation could also subject us to significant liabilities.

Our Certificate of Incorporation provides that the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware and the federal district courts of the United States of America will be the exclusive forums for substantially all disputes between us and our stockholders, which could limit our stockholders’ ability to obtain a favorable judicial forum for disputes with us or our directors, officers or employees.

Our Certificate of Incorporation provides that the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware (or, if and only if the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware lacks subject matter jurisdiction, any state court located within the State of Delaware or, if and only if all such state courts lack subject matter jurisdiction, the federal district court for the District of Delaware) is the exclusive forum for the following claims or causes of action under Delaware statutory or common law: (a) any derivative claim or cause of action brought on our behalf; (b) any claim or cause of action for breach of a fiduciary duty owed by any of our current or former directors, officers or other employees to us or our stockholders; (c) any claim or cause of action against us or any of our current or former directors, officers or other employees, arising out of or pursuant to any provision of the Delaware General Corporation Law (the “DGCL”), our certificate of incorporation or our bylaws; (d) any claim or cause of action seeking to interpret, apply, enforce or determine the validity of our certificate of incorporation or our bylaws; (e) any action or proceeding as to which the DGCL confers jurisdiction to the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware; and (f) any claim or cause of action against us or any of our current or former directors, officers or other employees that is governed by the internal-affairs doctrine, in all cases to the fullest extent permitted by law and subject to the court having personal jurisdiction over the indispensable parties named as defendants. This provision would not apply to claims or causes of action brought to enforce a duty or liability created by the Exchange Act, or any other claim for which the federal courts have exclusive jurisdiction, or the Securities Act.

Furthermore, Section 22 of the Securities Act creates concurrent jurisdiction for federal and state courts over all such Securities Act actions. Accordingly, both state and federal courts have jurisdiction to entertain such claims. To prevent having to litigate claims in multiple jurisdictions and the threat of inconsistent or contrary rulings by different courts, among other considerations, our Certificate of Incorporation provides that the federal district courts of the United States of America will be the exclusive forum for resolving any complaint asserting a cause of action arising under the Securities Act. While the Delaware courts have determined that such choice of forum provisions are facially valid, a stockholder may nevertheless seek to bring a claim in a venue other than those designated in the exclusive forum provisions. In such instance, we would expect to vigorously assert the validity and enforceability of the exclusive forum provisions of our Certificate of Incorporation. This may require significant additional costs associated with resolving such action in other jurisdictions and there can be no assurance that the provision will be enforced by a court in those other jurisdictions.

These exclusive forum provisions may limit a stockholder’s ability to bring a claim in a judicial forum that it finds favorable for disputes with us or our directors, officers, or other employees, which may discourage lawsuits against us and our directors, officers and other employees. If a court were to find either exclusive-forum provision in our Certificate of Incorporation to be inapplicable or unenforceable in an action, we may incur additional costs associated with resolving the dispute in other jurisdictions, which could seriously harm our business.

Changes in law or regulations, or a failure to comply with any laws and regulations, may adversely affect our business, investments and results of operations.

We are subject to laws and regulations enacted by national, regional and local governments, including in particular, reporting and other requirements under the Exchange Act. Compliance with, and monitoring of, applicable laws and regulations may be difficult, time consuming and costly. Those laws and regulations and their interpretation and application may also change from time to time and those changes could have a material adverse effect on our business, investments and results of operations. In addition, a failure to comply with applicable laws or regulations, as interpreted and applied, could result in fines, injunctive relief or similar remedies which could be costly to us or limit our ability to operate.

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USE OF PROCEEDS

All of the Common Stock and Warrants offered by the Selling Securityholders pursuant to this prospectus will be sold by the Selling Securityholders for their respective accounts. We will not receive any of the proceeds from these sales.

We will receive up to an aggregate of approximately $90.2 million from the exercise of the Warrants, assuming the exercise in full of all of the Warrants for cash. We expect to use the net proceeds from the exercise of the Warrants for general corporate purposes. We will have broad discretion over the use of proceeds from the exercise of the Warrants. There is no assurance that the holders of the Warrants will elect to exercise any or all of such Warrants. To the extent that the Warrants are exercised on a “cashless basis,” the amount of cash we would receive from the exercise of the Warrants will decrease.

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DETERMINATION OF OFFERING PRICE

The offering price of the shares of Common Stock underlying the Warrants offered hereby is determined by reference to the exercise price of the Warrants of $11.50 per share. The Public Warrants are listed on Nasdaq under the symbol “MILEW.”

We cannot currently determine the price or prices at which shares of our Common Stock or Warrants may be sold by the Selling Securityholders under this prospectus.

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MARKET INFORMATION FOR COMMON STOCK AND DIVIDEND POLICY

Market Information

Our Common Stock and Public Warrants are currently listed on Nasdaq under the symbols “MILE” and “MILEW,” respectively. Prior to the consummation of the Merger, our Common Stock, units and Public Warrants were listed on Nasdaq under the symbols “INAQ,” “INAQU” and “INAQW,” respectively. As of February 9, 2021, following the completion of the Merger, there were 315 holders of record of our Common Stock and three holders of record of our Warrants. We currently do not intend to list the Placement Warrants offered hereby on any stock exchange or stock market.

Dividend Policy

We have not paid any cash dividends on our Common Stock to date. We may retain future earnings, if any, for future operations, expansion and debt repayment and has no current plans to pay cash dividends for the foreseeable future. Any decision to declare and pay dividends in the future will be made at the discretion of our Board of Directors (the “Board”) and will depend on, among other things, our results of operations, financial condition, cash requirements, contractual restrictions and other factors that the Board may deem relevant. In addition, our ability to pay dividends may be limited by covenants of any existing and future outstanding indebtedness we or our subsidiaries incur. We do not anticipate declaring any cash dividends to holders of the Common Stock in the foreseeable future.

Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

As of December 31, 2020, we did not have any securities authorized for issuance under equity compensation plans. In connection with the Merger, our stockholders approved the Metromile, Inc. 2021 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2021 Plan”) on February 9, 2021, which became effective immediately upon the Closing, and we assumed the Legacy Metromile options, which were issued under the MetroMile, Inc. 2011 Equity Incentive Plan, which was approved by its stockholders.

We intend to file one or more registration statements on Form S-8 under the Securities Act to register the shares of Common Stock issued or issuable under the 2021 Plan and the assumed Legacy Metromile options. Any such Form S-8 registration statement will become effective automatically upon filing. We expect that the initial registration statement on Form S-8 will cover shares of Common Stock underlying the 2021 Plan and the assumed Legacy Metromile options. Once these shares are registered, they can be sold in the public market upon issuance, subject to applicable restrictions.

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SELECTED HISTORICAL CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL INFORMATION OF Legacy METROMILE

The following information is only a summary and should be read in conjunction with Metromile’s consolidated financial statements and related notes contained elsewhere in this prospectus and information discussed under “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” The historical results included below and elsewhere in this prospectus are not indicative of Metromile’s future performance.

The summary consolidated statements of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019 and the summary consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2018 and 2019 are each derived from Metromile’s audited consolidated financial statements appearing elsewhere in this prospectus. The summary consolidated statement of operations data for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2020, and the summary consolidated balance sheet data as of September 30, 2020 are derived from Metromile’s unaudited consolidated financial statements appearing elsewhere in this prospectus. The Metromile unaudited interim consolidated financial statements were prepared on the same basis as its audited financial statements. The historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected in the future.

 

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 

Years Ended
December 31,

Consolidated Statement of Operations Data:

 

2019

 

2020

 

2018

 

2019

   

(In thousands, except share and per share data)

Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Premiums earned, net

 

$

21,863

 

 

$

9,360

 

 

$

33,796

 

 

$

23,807

 

Interest Income

 

 

1,583

 

 

 

500

 

 

 

1,412

 

 

 

1,898

 

Other revenue

 

 

22,507

 

 

 

14,499

 

 

 

19,108

 

 

 

27,050

 

Total revenue

 

 

45,953

 

 

 

24,359

 

 

 

54,316

 

 

 

52,755

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Expenses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Losses and loss adjustment expenses

 

 

24,780

 

 

 

12,214

 

 

 

40,663

 

 

 

30,758

 

Policy servicing expense and other

 

 

11,998

 

 

 

12,803

 

 

 

13,648

 

 

 

16,297

 

Sales, marketing and other acquisition costs

 

 

18,224

 

 

 

3,616

 

 

 

18,241

 

 

 

23,954

 

Research and development

 

 

6,636

 

 

 

6,668

 

 

 

6,417

 

 

 

9,055

 

Amortization of capitalized software

 

 

7,829

 

 

 

8,311

 

 

 

9,491

 

 

 

10,648

 

Other operating expenses

 

 

14,040

 

 

 

13,138

 

 

 

14,588

 

 

 

18,896

 

Total Operating Expenses

 

 

83,507

 

 

 

56,750

 

 

 

103,048

 

 

 

109,608

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loss from operations

 

 

(37,554

)

 

 

(32,391

)

 

 

(48,732

)

 

 

(56,853

)

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other expense

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense

 

 

56

 

 

 

3,453

 

 

 

410

 

 

 

247

 

Increase in fair value of stock warrant liability

 

 

 

 

 

640

 

 

 

352

 

 

 

92

 

Total other expense

 

 

56

 

 

 

4,093

 

 

 

762

 

 

 

339

 

Net loss before taxes

 

 

(37,610

)

 

 

(36,484

)

 

 

(49,494

)

 

 

(57,192

)

Income tax provision/(benefit)

 

 

37

 

 

 

(67

)

 

 

(125

)

 

 

37

 

Net loss

 

$

(37,647

)

 

$

(36,417

)

 

$

(49,369

)

 

$

(57,229

)

Net loss per share, basic and diluted

 

$

(4.51

)

 

$

(4.16

)

 

$

(6.41

)

 

$

(6.85

)

Weighted average common shares outstanding,
basic and diluted

 

 

8,351,575

 

 

 

8,746,655

 

 

 

7,697,570

 

 

 

8,359,973

 

 

As of September 30, 2020

 

As of
December 31,

2018

 

2019

   

(In thousands)

Consolidated Balance Sheet Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$

202,774

 

 

$

206,812

 

 

$

210,494

 

Total liabilities

 

 

176,721